Anatomy of a Miracle: new arrival The End of Apartheid and the Birth of the New high quality South Africa outlet online sale

Anatomy of a Miracle: new arrival The End of Apartheid and the Birth of the New high quality South Africa outlet online sale

Anatomy of a Miracle: new arrival The End of Apartheid and the Birth of the New high quality South Africa outlet online sale

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The late 1980s were a dismal time inside South Africa. Mandela''s African National Congress was banned. Thousands of ANC supporters were jailed without charge. Government hit squads assassinated and terrorized opponents of white rule. Ordinary South Africans, black and white, lived in a perpetual state of dread. Journalist Patti Waldmeir evokes this era of uncertainty in Anatomy of a Miracle, her comprehensive new book about the stunning and-historically speaking-swift tranformation of South Africa from white minority oligarchy to black-ruled democracy. Much that Waldmeir documents in this carefully researched and elegantly written book has been well reported in the press and in previous books. But what distinguishes her work is a reporter''s attention to detail and a historian''s sense of sweep and relevance. . . .Waldmeir has written a deeply reasoned book, but one that also acknowledges the power of human will and the tug of shared destiny."-Philadelphia Inquirer

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Top reviews from the United States

Monica M. Park
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fabulously told story
Reviewed in the United States on January 27, 2014
This is a well told account of the end of apartheid in South Africa. She gives the reader the background of the opening of talks between the hated National Party government and the exiled, outlawed African National Congress (ANC). At times she assumes the reader knows more... See more
This is a well told account of the end of apartheid in South Africa. She gives the reader the background of the opening of talks between the hated National Party government and the exiled, outlawed African National Congress (ANC). At times she assumes the reader knows more about the topic, and was clearly written right after Nelson Mandela came to power, so it can be hard to remember who some of the characters are. Also it would be good to have maps of South Africa in the book. I had a good sense of geography, but I still needed my atlas nearby. A time line of SA history would help too, to give readers a better sense of the history of white settlement in South Africa. Overall I would say it was an excellent book, that tells how one the most evil regimes in history walked back from the brink, and negotiated an end of years of white domination and control.
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Prajwal Acharya
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
New like never used before
Reviewed in the United States on October 3, 2017
It was as the description provided. New like never used before!
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Daniel Villines
5.0 out of 5 stars
A Miracle from Every Perspective
Reviewed in the United States on September 11, 2021
Upon recently finishing James Michener''s 1,250 pages that comprise The Covenant, I realized that Michener only guessed at the true ending of Apartheid some 15 years before it actually happened. He provided four possibilities, and to his credit, one of them actually... See more
Upon recently finishing James Michener''s 1,250 pages that comprise The Covenant, I realized that Michener only guessed at the true ending of Apartheid some 15 years before it actually happened. He provided four possibilities, and to his credit, one of them actually happened. While I watched the transformation, my perspective was from halfway around the world and far removed from having an actual vested interest in it. The South African transformation, indeed, seemed like a miracle.

As a reporter covering South Africa for the Financial Times of London, Patti Waldmeir''s credentials want for nothing. Before and throughout the transformation, Waldmeir was in South Africa and the adjoining African countries that housed the African National Congress (ANC) in exile. She interviewed the leaders, negotiators, and people on both side throughout the decade-long journey that was the actual transformation. The result of her diligence and dedication is this book, and for a recounting of history, it doesn’t get any better than this.

As for the miracle that''s dissected by Waldmeir, it''s comprised of the South African nation. Blacks and whites were proud to be South African and more importantly, they respected each others claims to the land of their heritage and home. On the whole, all of the people of South Africa deeply wanted to be free. It''s obvious that the oppressed wanted their freedom to determine the course of their future, but the oppressors deeply felt the burden of their subjugation. There is a quote in the book from Nelson Mandela that sums up this idea perfectly:

“A man who takes away another man’s freedom is a prisoner of hatred, he is locked behind the bars of prejudice and narrow-mindedness...The oppressed and the oppressor alike are robbed of their humanity. The oppressor must be liberated just as surly as the oppressed.” - Nelson Mandela

This want of freedom was the motivating, moral and ethical force on both sides. South Africa was fortunate to have produced two leaders, Nelson Mandela and F. W. de Klerk, who both had the wisdom and pragmatism to feel their way though a murky path. From my US perspective that path seemed impassable. Their accomplishment is shared and obvious. The path, however, was indeed filled with traps, pitfalls, and decisions that were rooted in a blind faith in their better angels.

As for the future, it is uncertain. The book was published in 1997, just after the transformation, which leaves me once again in search of an ending, at least as it exists today. However, Waldmeir provided her hope for the future of the New South Africa with her passage:

“South Africa, A land of intolerance, and despair would deliver itself a miracle. Like every miracle it had its antecedents...it was less a gift from God than a gift from men to other men. Perhaps there is a chance - just a chance - that such a man-made miracle can endure.” - Patti Waldemar
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Gderf
5.0 out of 5 stars
Best combined sociology and politics
Reviewed in the United States on November 28, 2011
There is a great deal of interest in the changing politics and different views of SA evident in movies such as ''Blood Diamonds'', ''Invictus'' and ''Color of Freedom''. This book is perhaps the best extension of these movies into a combined view of SA. The book does a great... See more
There is a great deal of interest in the changing politics and different views of SA evident in
movies such as ''Blood Diamonds'', ''Invictus'' and ''Color of Freedom''. This book is perhaps the best extension of these movies into a combined view of SA. The book does a great job of combining sociology and recent history. The author adds a wonderful writing style to extensive familiarity so as to provide human interest in a complex subject. Instead of the popular use of a ''quote de jour'' epigraph Waldmeir inserts a relevant sample of her own journalism to introduce each chapter. It''s a very effective device.

While clearly expressing empathy with the justice of the black majority cause under Apartheid, Waldmeir does not whitewash Mandela and the ANC for responsibility of violence or
failures in mitigating SA problems of poverty disease and violence. There is a very even handed treatment including failure of Codesa II negotiations. She points out how good the RSA record is relative to other African states like Zimbabwe and Zambia. Readers will no doubt engage in contrasting RSA and USA politics. Waldmeir credits Botha, DeKlerk and the Afrikaner administration for their courage in giving up power as she investigates the question of why. She creates great interest in the attempts to provide an equitable sharing of power as it covers political struggles among the NP, ANC and Inkatha parties.

Although not exactly a treatise in government, the book makes one think about government structure by coverage of the new RSA government and constitution. Especially interesting are the negotiations that took place between the NP and ANC during the period between the release of Mandela in 1991 and the formation of the new government after the election of 1994. Negotiations included the idea of a ''tricameral'' legislature. DeKlerk wanted a ''negative veto'', a throwback to Calhoun''s idea of ''nullification.'' After rejection by Mandela, who termed it "loser takes all" that lead to the very interesting politics of today whereby the white minority is attempting the same thing by other means. Success or failure is still an open question.

The best books are written in the spirit of inquiry without ideological bias and this is a good one. Too bad the book drifts out of date with time. Following Walmeir''s journalism would be an excellent way of keeping up with changing conditions in SA sociology and politics. This is more informative than other recent books on SA which tend to focus on a mini biography and character analysis of Mandela.
One person found this helpful
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Gderf
5.0 out of 5 stars
Best combined sociology and politics
Reviewed in the United States on November 16, 2011
There is a great deal of interest in the changing politics and different views of SA evident in movies such as ''Blood Diamonds'', ''Invictus'' and ''Color of Freedom''. This book is perhaps the best extension of these movies into a combined view of SA. The book does a great job... See more
There is a great deal of interest in the changing politics and different views of SA evident in movies such as ''Blood Diamonds'', ''Invictus'' and ''Color of Freedom''. This book is perhaps the best extension of these movies into a combined view of SA. The book does a great job of combining sociology and recent history. The author adds a wonderful writing style to extensive familiarity so as to provide human interest in a complex subject. Instead of the popular use of a ''quote de jour'' Waldmeir inserts a relevant sample of her own journalism to introduce each chapter. It''s a very effective device.

While clearly expressing empathy with the justice of the black majority cause under Apartheid, Waldmeir does not whitewash Mandela and the ANC for responsibility of violence or failures in mitigating SA problems of poverty disease and violence. There is a very even handed treatment including failure of Codesa II negotiations. She points out how good the RSA record is relative to other African states like Zimbabwe and Zambia. Readers will no doubt engage in contrasting RSA and USA politics. Waldmeir credits Botha, DeKlerk and the Afrikaner administration for their courage in giving up power as she investigates the question of why. She creates great interest in the attempts to provide an equitable sharing of power as it covers political struggles among the NP, ANC and Inkatha parties.

Although not exactly a treatise in government, the book makes one think about government structure by coverage of the new RSA government and constitution. Especially interesting are the negotiations that took place between the NP and ANC during the period between the release of Mandela in 1991 and the formation of the new government after the election of 1994. Negotiations included the idea of a ''tricameral'' legislature. DeKlerk wanted a ''negative veto'', a throwback to Calhoun''s idea of ''nullification.'' After rejection by Mandela, who termed it "loser takes all" that lead to the very interesting politics of today whereby the white minority is attempting the same thing by other means. Success or failure is still an open question.

The best books are written in the spirit of inquiry without ideological bias and this is a good one. Too bad the book drifts out of date with time. Following Walmeir''s journalism would be an excellent way of keeping up with changing conditions in SA sociology and politics. This is more informative than other recent books on SA which tend to focus on a mini biography and character analysis of Mandela.
One person found this helpful
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wutanglen
5.0 out of 5 stars
A Great History Book
Reviewed in the United States on February 14, 2000
Anatomy of a Miracle is one of those history books you never forget. It does such a good job putting you there. You feel like you are at the meeting between Mandela and DeKlerk. This is history at its best. Anyone interested in Current Events or the History of South... See more
Anatomy of a Miracle is one of those history books you never forget. It does such a good job putting you there. You feel like you are at the meeting between Mandela and DeKlerk. This is history at its best. Anyone interested in Current Events or the History of South Africa and its transformation from Apartheid and White Rule to One Man One Vote and Democracy needs to read this book. I had no idea that Mandela and the South African government had been in negotiation long before Mandela''s release. I also had no idea how well Mandela used his ability to speak Afrikaaner and his knowledge of Afrikaaner History to while negotiating to end Apartheid. You see the challenges DeKlerk, Mandela, and all of South Africa had to overcome. And they did. This is a short book, but after reading this you will become an expert on the events that led to the end of Apartheid and the beginning of Democracy in South Africa. This is a great book.
12 people found this helpful
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ZMC
5.0 out of 5 stars
Great Book so far
Reviewed in the United States on October 6, 2007
Anatomy of a Miracle: The End of Apartheid and the Birth of the New South Africa This book came on time and was delivered directly to my place of residence within two days. So far this book is worth more than just an assignment for class. This book... See more
Anatomy of a Miracle: The End of Apartheid and the Birth of the New South Africa
This book came on time and was delivered directly to my place of residence within two days. So far this book is worth more than just an assignment for class. This book also helps me to see another side of conflict that most people may never see in their life time; unless they live within a collective culture where group needs are put before the individual self.
3 people found this helpful
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M. Chapman
5.0 out of 5 stars
Insightful and dramatic!
Reviewed in the United States on May 18, 1998
Reads like a cloak and dagger thriller at times. This is a riveting account of the end of apartheid and the birth of democracy in a society that should be, by all rights, engaged in civil war at this time. Instead, Ms. Waldmeir gives us the reasons, historically and... See more
Reads like a cloak and dagger thriller at times. This is a riveting account of the end of apartheid and the birth of democracy in a society that should be, by all rights, engaged in civil war at this time. Instead, Ms. Waldmeir gives us the reasons, historically and diplomatically, as to why this amazing transition took place in relative peace. She tries to give a fair representation of the roles of all the major players in this incredibly complex real life drama. I found the writing to be very insightful as an academic work while at the same time it was told as the dramatic, tension filled drama that the story truly is.
12 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

JGAI
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 2, 2013
Very well written and full of insight based on extensive and intensive high quality journalistic engagement with the South African situation during the transition period..
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Anatomy of a Miracle: new arrival The End of Apartheid and the Birth of the New high quality South Africa outlet online sale

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Anatomy of a Miracle: new arrival The End of Apartheid and the Birth of the New high quality South Africa outlet online sale

Anatomy of a Miracle: new arrival The End of Apartheid and the Birth of the New high quality South Africa outlet online sale

Anatomy of a Miracle: new arrival The End of Apartheid and the Birth of the New high quality South Africa outlet online sale

Anatomy of a Miracle: new arrival The End of Apartheid and the Birth of the New high quality South Africa outlet online sale

Anatomy of a Miracle: new arrival The End of Apartheid and the Birth of the New high quality South Africa outlet online sale