Brainstorm: high quality The Power and Purpose of sale the Teenage Brain outlet online sale

Brainstorm: high quality The Power and Purpose of sale the Teenage Brain outlet online sale

Brainstorm: high quality The Power and Purpose of sale the Teenage Brain outlet online sale
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Product Description

In this New York Times–bestselling book, Dr. Daniel Siegel shows parents how to turn one of the most challenging developmental periods in their children’s lives into one of the most rewarding.

Between the ages of twelve and twenty-four, the brain changes in important and, at times, challenging ways. In Brainstorm, Dr. Daniel Siegel busts a number of commonly held myths about adolescence—for example, that it is merely a stage of “immaturity” filled with often “crazy” behavior. According to Siegel, during adolescence we learn vital skills, such as how to leave home and enter the larger world, connect deeply with others, and safely experiment and take risks.

Drawing on important new research in the field of interpersonal neurobiology, Siegel explores exciting ways in which understanding how the brain functions can improve the lives of adolescents, making their relationships more fulfilling and less lonely and distressing on both sides of the generational divide.

Review

"Brainstorm is a must read book for every parent if they want to avoid emotional turbulence in their own lives as their children go through adolescence. It''s lifesaving for the whole family."
—Deepak Chopra, MD

Brainstorm is eye-opening and inspiring, a great gift to us all—teens, parents of teens, and anyone who wants a full and rich life on this planet. Daniel Siegel shows how the supposed downsides of the teen years all have upsides, and that the lessons for living that await teens are ones any of us, at any age, can learn from.”
Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence
 
"Siegel emerges as a bighearted writer, fully convinced that we all possess the fundamental virtues to navigate the choppy waters of adolescence, and he is eager for us to set them loose, working with adolescents to cultivate the positive aspects—and he is hugely convincing of the intense engagement and creativity that often accompany this time period in a person’s life. Smart advice...on providing the most supportive and brain-healthy environment during the tumultuous years of adolescence."
—KIRKUS REVIEWS

“This book is chock-full of cutting-edge knowledge as well as a deep compassion for teenagers, the adults they will become, and the teenagers in all of us.”
Alanis Morisette

Brainstorm is a necessary look at why adolescents do what they do that can put parents in an emotional frenzy. The information that Dr. Dan Siegel shares is not only invaluable for understanding your growing child''s brain, but helps build more compassion and patience. A gift for us all.”
—Goldie Hawn
 
"By the end of this book, the teenager has been transformed from a monstrous force into a thinking, feeling, and entirely approachable human being."
—PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

“I strongly recommend Brainstorm to teens and those who care for them.”
Mary Pipher, author of Reviving Ophelia

“‘You just don’t get me’ is a common refrain from teenagers to their parents and teachers. Adolescents who read this book will discover that Daniel Siegel gets them . . . This respectfulness is why the book works so well as a manual for adolescents, as well as for their parents and mentors.”
Lawrence Cohen, author of The Opposite of Worry

About the Author

Daniel J. Siegel, M.D., is clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, founding codirector of the UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center, and executive director of the Mindsight Institute. He is also coauthor of Parenting from the Inside Out and The Whole-Brain Child, and the proud father of two children in their twenties.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

The Benefits and Challenges of Adolescence
 
The essential features of adolescence emerge because of healthy, natural changes in the brain. Since the brain influences both our minds and our relationships, knowing about the brain can help us with our inner experience and our social connections. In our journey I’ll show how this understanding, and learning the steps to strengthen the brain in practical ways, can help us build a more resilient mind and more rewarding relationships with others.
 
During the teen years, our minds change in the way we remember, think, reason, focus attention, make decisions, and relate to others. From around age twelve to age twenty-four, there is a burst of growth and maturation taking place as never before in our lives. Understanding the nature of these changes can help us create a more positive and productive life journey.
 
I’m the father of two adolescents. I also work as a physician in the practice of child, adolescent, and adult psychiatry, helping kids, teens, adults, couples, and families make sense of this exciting time in life. In addition to working as a psychotherapist, I also teach about mental health. What has struck me in each of these roles is that there is no book available that reveals the view that the adolescent period of life is in reality the one with the most power for courage and creativity. Life is on fire when we hit our teens. And these changes are not something to avoid or just get through, but to encourage. Brainstorm was born from the need to focus on the positive essence of this period of life for adolescents and for adults.
 
While the adolescent years may be challenging, the changes in the brain that help support the unique emergence of the adolescent mind can create qualities in us that help not only during our adolescent years, if used wisely, but also as we enter adulthood and live fully as an adult. How we navigate the adolescent years has a direct impact on how we’ll live the rest of our lives. Those creative qualities also can help our larger world, offering new insights and innovations that naturally emerge from the push back against the status quo and from the energy of the teen years.
 
For every new way of thinking and feeling and behaving with its positive potential, there is also a possible downside. Yet there is a way to learn how to make the most of the important positive qualities of the teenage mind during adolescence and to use those qualities well in the adult years that come later.
 
Brain changes during the early teen years set up four qualities of our minds during adolescence: novelty seeking, social engagement, increased emotional intensity, and creative exploration. There are changes in the fundamental circuits of the brain that make the adolescent period different from childhood. These changes affect how teens seek rewards in trying new things, connect with their peers in different ways, feel more intense emotions, and push back on the existing ways of doing things to create new ways of being in the world. Each of these changes is necessary to create the important shifts that happen in our thinking, feeling, interacting, and decision making during our adolescence. Yes, these positive changes have negative possibilities, too. Let’s see how each of these four features of the adolescent brain’s growth has both upsides and downsides, and how they fill our lives with both benefits and risks.
 
1. Novelty seeking emerges from an increased drive for rewards in the circuits of the adolescent brain that creates the inner motivation to try something new and feel life more fully, creating more engagement in life. Downside: Sensation seeking and risk taking that overemphasize the thrill and downplay the risk result in dangerous behaviors and injury. Impulsivity can turn an idea into an action without pause to reflect on the consequences. Upside: Being open to change and living passionately emerge, as the exploration of novelty is honed into a fascination for life and a drive to design new ways of doing things and living with a sense of adventure.
 
2. Social engagement enhances peer connectedness and creates new friendships. Downside: Teens isolated from adults and surrounded only by other teens have increased-risk behavior, and the total rejection of adults and adult knowledge and reasoning increases those risks. Upside: The drive for social connection leads to the creation of supportive relationships that are the research-proven best predictors of well-being, longevity, and happiness throughout the life span.
 
3. Increased emotional intensity gives an enhanced vitality to life. Downside: Intense emotion may rule the day, leading to impulsivity, moodiness, and extreme, sometimes unhelpful, reactivity. Upside: Life lived with emotional intensity can be filled with energy and a sense of vital drive that give an exuberance and zest for being alive on the planet.
 
 4. Creative exploration with an expanded sense of consciousness. An adolescent’s new conceptual thinking and abstract reasoning allow questioning of the status quo, approaching problems with “out of the box” strategies, the creation of new ideas, and the emergence of innovation. Downside: Searching for the meaning of life during the teen years can lead to a crisis of identity, vulnerability to peer pressure, and a lack of direction and purpose. Upside: If the mind can hold on to thinking and imagining and perceiving the world in new ways within consciousness, of creatively exploring the spectrum of experiences that are possible, the sense of being in a rut that can sometimes pervade adult life can be minimized and instead an experience of the “ordinary being extraordinary” can be cultivated. Not a bad strategy for living a full life!
 
While we can brainstorm lots of new ideas inside us that we can share collaboratively during the creative explorations and novelty seeking of adolescence, we can also enter another kind of brainstorm as we lose our coordination and balance and our emotions act like a tsunami, flooding us with feelings. That’s when we get filled with not only mental excitement but also with mental confusion. Adolescence involves both types of brainstorms.
                              
In a nutshell, the brain changes of adolescence offer both risk and opportunity. How we navigate the waters of adolescence—as young individuals on the journey or as adults walking with them—can help guide the ship that is our life into treacherous places or into exciting adventures. The decision is ours.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
1,170 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

Steven Clark Cunningham
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very valuable for those with adolescents in your lives!
Reviewed in the United States on January 5, 2018
Just finished this book on that intriguing creature that is the adolescent brain. I read it and listened to it both. A little slow in the middle, but definitely worth the time to better understand the adolescent mind and normal (but seemingly abnormal)... See more
Just finished this book on that intriguing creature that is the adolescent brain.

I read it and listened to it both. A little slow in the middle, but definitely worth the time to better understand the adolescent mind and normal (but seemingly abnormal) adolescent behavior!

He describes the ESSENCE of adolESSENCE:

"ES: An Emotional Spark is revealed in the enhanced way emotion generated from sub-cortical areas washes over the cortical circuits of reasoning. The downsides are emotional storms and moodiness; the upside is a powerful passion to live life fully, to capture life being on fire.

SE: Social Engagement emerges as teens turn more toward peers than parents, the downside being falling prey to peer pressure simply to gain membership in a group, the upside being the central importance of supportive relationships in our lives. Relationships are the key factor associated with medical and mental health, longevity, and even happiness.

N: Novelty-seeking emerges from shifts in the brain’s dopamine system with the downside of risk-taking behavior and injury, and the upside of having the courage to leave the familiar, certain, and safe home nest for the unfamiliar, uncertain, potentially unsafe world beyond.

CE: And our Creative Exploration of adolescence is found as we push against the status quo, imagining how things could be, not simply accepting them for what they are. The downside? Not just conforming to life as usual can be disorienting and stressful. The upside? The thrill and passion of discovery—and the reality that most innovations in art, music, science and technology emerge from the adolescent mind."

(quotation from his website)
23 people found this helpful
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wlg2010
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good, but Tedious
Reviewed in the United States on August 7, 2017
I was recommended this book by a friend, and have found it useful, but a bit tedious for my liking. There is some helpful information in the book relative to how teens (in my case boy) change as they get older, and it was good to know that my teen''s current behavior, while... See more
I was recommended this book by a friend, and have found it useful, but a bit tedious for my liking. There is some helpful information in the book relative to how teens (in my case boy) change as they get older, and it was good to know that my teen''s current behavior, while not bad, was normal. The mechanics (or in this case the science) of the brain is thoroughly covered -- and in my opinion, a little too thoroughly. The author decided to write the book with both an adolescent and adult reader in mind, which is fine, but I find it hard to believe that many adolescents made it through this book (but his quotes inside the book suggest otherwise).
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GirlScoutDad
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Book Quickly Wanders Away from its Title Message, Ironically, Like a Teenager with a Short Attention Span
Reviewed in the United States on March 10, 2014
I read with alacrity "Brain Based Parenting: the neuroscience of caregiving for healthy attachment", on which Daniel J. Seigel was the third author, and gave that book 5 stars in an Amazon.com review. So I started out with high expections for Siegel''s more recent work,... See more
I read with alacrity "Brain Based Parenting: the neuroscience of caregiving for healthy attachment", on which Daniel J. Seigel was the third author, and gave that book 5 stars in an Amazon.com review. So I started out with high expections for Siegel''s more recent work, Brainstorm. Really, I did. Unfortunately the weaknesses of the book far outweighed its strengths, for me anyway, as I''ll outline below. There are multiple other books on raising and understanding teenagers I''d recommend before this one, as I''ll list at the end.

Strengths:
(1) It''s always good to remind oneself of the positive aspects of the developmental phase of the adolescent. Siegel lists these strengths as: intense and spontaneous emotions, intense and powerful peer and social connections, a spark of uniqueness and originality, and a profound search for one''s identity and place in the universe. Frustrated parents can easily fall into the trap of seeing only your teenager''s faults and negative behaviors. Remembering to see the upside (which is really only discussed in the first chapter of the book) is a good thing.

(2) Somehow Siegel wanders into the topic of healing your brain from trauma. During the course of this digression, he reviews an intriguing theory of psychological trauma (p. 176ff) that painful memories that are ''locked up'' in the right hemisphere - the seat of emotion, imagery, and "implicit" (timeless and voiceless) memories - cause intense pain, fear, and flashbacks. When the right and left (verbal, analytic, logical and chronological) brain are integrated, the left side of the brain can give a coherent narrative to the trauma story and place it into a past perspective. Healing from trauma then occurs when what was formerly intense, limitless, and present danger, is transformed into more comprehensible, limited, and coherent past experience. This is a powerful theory of trauma and healing and helps to explain why social connections and social supports aid in the prevention and healing of PTSD. Note: the theory is not presented here for the first time, but Siegel''s review of it is interesting.

Weaknesses:
(1) In contrast to "Brain-Based Parenting", I found the book haphazardly organized and the writing style surprisingly poor. Siegel''s sentences were run-on, off topic, and varied irritatingly between medicalese and schmaltzy sentimentality. His topics were all over the map, too: from the title topic, to attachment theory, to general advice for getting enough sleep and eating well, to "Mindsight" exercises for meditation and raising awareness. I was disappointed; I felt the book didn''t stick to any consistent theme and was probably a hastily put together collection of blog posts. Search "teenage brain fitness" or "the adolescent brain" on Amazon.com and one will find many appealing titles on the topic that look more propitious than this one.

(2) Siegel''s stated intention is to write a book intdended to be read by both parents and their teenagers, perhaps even read aloud from one to another. Despite a number of cute cartoons, I can hardly imagine a teenager in modern America today who could make it successfully through this meandering, poorly written volume. I have one teenager and one pre-teen, and I am involved in volunteering and in contact with many of my daughters'' friends (and, well, I also happen to be a psychiatrist and have seen hundreds of teens in crisis through a psychiatric emergency center in Fairfax County, Virginia). The only thing I can say in response to the idea of an American teenager finding this book readable would be "fuggedaboudit." Or maybe "you must be Cray-Cray."

I found the following books infinitely more useful, readable, and enjoyable than Brainstorm: (1) Haim Ginot''s "Between Parent and Teenager", (2) Thoms Phelan''s "surviving your teenager", (3) Anything by Gershen Kaufman, Ph.D., especially "personal power for teens", (4) "Brain-Based Parenting" (see above), and (5)Ginsburg''s "Roots and Wings." I tried hard to find the positives in this book; I read around five books per month so I am not averse to working hard to get something from a read, so I don''t give out the dreaded "2 star" rating casually. I had to put this one down for long stretches and really force myself to punch on through, however. There are any number of other books on teenagers and their development I would encourage readers to turn to before, or instead of, this one.
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Alison
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Parents of Teenagers MUST read
Reviewed in the United States on September 4, 2020
I bought this book when my son was 13 and started middle school. He, seemingly, changed over night. He was also dealing with the betrayal of his best friend once they got to middle school, and mourning that friendship. Seventh grade was not easy for him. After reading... See more
I bought this book when my son was 13 and started middle school. He, seemingly, changed over night. He was also dealing with the betrayal of his best friend once they got to middle school, and mourning that friendship. Seventh grade was not easy for him.
After reading the that you didn’t have to read the entire book to get something from it, I immediately flipped to the section that was most relevant to my son. Of course I couldn’t fix the hurt he was feeling from the loss of friendship, and the betrayal of a friend he had been best friends with for the last 6 years; but this book really helped me understand how to be there for him and most importantly, how the brain changes in these critical years of puberty. I really credit this book to opening my eyes to the teenage brain. It really transformed my relationship with my son when he hit puberty.

We have to evolve our relationship with our children as they grow, and this book more than guides you in that direction. It’s an unbelievable resource during the pre-teen and teenage years.
3 people found this helpful
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GrantClan
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A.C.R.O.N.Y.M.
Reviewed in the United States on June 26, 2019
This book has multiple acronyms per page. This is extremely distracting and does nothing to help remember anything due to the number of times a new acronym is introduced. The information is alright, but should no be given to an adolescent to read about themselves. This is... See more
This book has multiple acronyms per page. This is extremely distracting and does nothing to help remember anything due to the number of times a new acronym is introduced. The information is alright, but should no be given to an adolescent to read about themselves. This is for parents to read to better understand their adolescent.
5 people found this helpful
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Janet Morrison-Lane
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Figuring out my teenager
Reviewed in the United States on March 28, 2020
This book was recommended to me by my counselor to help me think through my interactions with my new teenager. The book provides a lot of reflective activities to do, which were a good practice, but not necessarily something I utilized a lot. I found the end of the book... See more
This book was recommended to me by my counselor to help me think through my interactions with my new teenager. The book provides a lot of reflective activities to do, which were a good practice, but not necessarily something I utilized a lot. I found the end of the book more helpful, simply because it told stories of individuals, which helped me think through my own challenges. Overall, it was a good book, but I have enjoyed the other Dan Siegel books more than this one.
3 people found this helpful
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Kate C
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A more nuanced view of the teenage brain
Reviewed in the United States on December 16, 2017
Great for adolescents and everyone that has to interact with them. As a middle school teacher, this presented information that I did not know. They are going through a lot of changes (not just hormonal!) that we all should understand.
12 people found this helpful
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Woman in Texas
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
So far so good!
Reviewed in the United States on May 11, 2017
Absolutely, hands down, one of my favorite authors. I''m not completely done reading this book, but so far so good. You cannot be completely without knowledge of behavioral sciences to comprehend this easily, but I feel like he did a very good job to explain it to those... See more
Absolutely, hands down, one of my favorite authors. I''m not completely done reading this book, but so far so good. You cannot be completely without knowledge of behavioral sciences to comprehend this easily, but I feel like he did a very good job to explain it to those without prior experience. I purchased this for a friend without such training previously and she said it was something she only partially had to re-read.
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Top reviews from other countries

Sian
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Book written in uncomplicated language
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 12, 2021
I liked the readability of this book, and the interesting facts it gave about the teenage brain. I also like the exercises it provides to improve brain function, as I believe these are so important. These talk you through some meditation exercises, visual, and other ways to...See more
I liked the readability of this book, and the interesting facts it gave about the teenage brain. I also like the exercises it provides to improve brain function, as I believe these are so important. These talk you through some meditation exercises, visual, and other ways to ''strengthen'' the brain.
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Anne
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very interesting and easy to read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 19, 2019
Really good read learnt a lot about my adolescents so can understand more about what they are going through and how their brain is working I found it ready to read and the tasks / exercises for mindfulness in it easy to understand and do I also counsel 11-18 yrs old and...See more
Really good read learnt a lot about my adolescents so can understand more about what they are going through and how their brain is working I found it ready to read and the tasks / exercises for mindfulness in it easy to understand and do I also counsel 11-18 yrs old and found it was help for for my work
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Katy Campbell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
excellent
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 6, 2019
everyone needs to read this !
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Aminarossini
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
"Brainstorm: The Power and purpose of the teenage brain" by Daniel J Siegel
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 20, 2014
I was recommended this book by the head of pupil & parent support at my daughter''s school. I have read it twice, found it extremely useful - full of important facts, information and, most importantly for me, positivity.
4 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
:-)
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 29, 2018
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