Breath: outlet online sale The New 2021 Science of a Lost Art online

Breath: outlet online sale The New 2021 Science of a Lost Art online

Breath: outlet online sale The New 2021 Science of a Lost Art online
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A New York Times Bestseller

A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of 2020

Named a Best Book of 2020 by NPR
 
“A fascinating scientific, cultural, spiritual and evolutionary history of the way humans breathe—and how we’ve all been doing it wrong for a long, long time.” —Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Big Magic and Eat Pray Love

No matter what you eat, how much you exercise, how skinny or young or wise you are, none of it matters if you’re not breathing properly.


There is nothing more essential to our health and well-being than breathing: take air in, let it out, repeat twenty-five thousand times a day. Yet, as a species, humans have lost the ability to breathe correctly, with grave consequences.

Journalist James Nestor travels the world to figure out what went wrong and how to fix it. The answers aren’t found in pulmonology labs, as we might expect, but in the muddy digs of ancient burial sites, secret Soviet facilities, New Jersey choir schools, and the smoggy streets of São Paulo. Nestor tracks down men and women exploring the hidden science behind ancient breathing practices like Pranayama, Sudarshan Kriya, and Tummo and teams up with pulmonary tinkerers to scientifically test long-held beliefs about how we breathe.

Modern research is showing us that making even slight adjustments to the way we inhale and exhale can jump-start athletic performance; rejuvenate internal organs; halt snoring, asthma, and autoimmune disease; and even straighten scoliotic spines. None of this should be possible, and yet it is.

Drawing on thousands of years of medical texts and recent cutting-edge studies in pulmonology, psychology, biochemistry, and human physiology, Breath turns the conventional wisdom of what we thought we knew about our most basic biological function on its head. You will never breathe the same again.

Review

A New York Times Bestseller
A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of 2020
An Amazon Best Science Book of 2020
2020 ASJA Award-Winner in the General Nonfiction Category
A Goodreads Award Finalist for Best Science & Technology Book of the Year
Named a Best Book of 2020 by NPR


“A fascinating scientific, cultural, spiritual, and evolutionary history of the way humans breathe—and how we’ve all been doing it wrong for a long, long time. I already feel calmer and healthier just in the last few days, from making a few simple changes in my breathing, based on what I’ve read…Our breath is a beautiful, healing, mysterious gift, and so is this book.” —Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Big Magic and Eat Pray Love

"I highly recommend this book." —Wim Hof 
 
“This book is awesome. Most people have no idea how to do breathing exercises and how beneficial they are. Over the last few weeks I’ve been using the methods I learned from his book and I can tell you there are absolutely some real benefits to be had I really enjoyed this book.” —Joe Rogan on Instagram

“Who would have thought something as simple as changing the way we breathe could be so revolutionary for our health? James Nestor is the perfect guide to the pulmonary world and has written a fascinating book, full of dazzling revelations.” —Dr. Rangan Chatterjee, international bestselling author of The Stress Solution

“It’s a rare popular-science book that keeps a reader up late, eyes glued to the pages. But Breath is just that fascinating. It will alarm you. It will gross you out. And it will inspire you. Who knew respiration could be so scintillating?” — Spirituality & Health

"In Breath, author and journalist James Nestor lays out in spellbinding and at once comedic and riveting fashion his ten year personal investigation of breathing. Who could imagine a “self help book” that reads like a page turning novel?! I couldn’t put it down."—Steven Gundry, M.D., New York Times bestselling author of The Plant Paradox series, The Longevity Paradox, and The Energy Paradox

“With his entertaining, eerily well-timed new book, James Nestor explains the science behind proper breathing and how we can transform our lungs and our lives. The book is brisk and detailed, a well-written read that is always entertaining, as he melds the personal, the historical, and the scientific.” — The Boston Globe

“A transformative book that changes how you think about your body and mind.” —Joshua Foer, New York Times–bestselling author of Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Memory
 
Breath provides a new perspective of modern-day technology and how we’ve unknowingly abandoned the answers we’ve always had. James Nestor artfully brings back what modern society has walked away from, by combining ancestral techniques and new age technology in one elegant book.” — Scientific Inquirer

"A wonderful book that reminds and enlightens us about how breath and mind are intertwined."—
Dr. Rahul Jandial, bestselling author of Life Lessons from a Brain Surgeon

Breath is an utterly fascinating journey into the ways we are wired. No matter who you are, you’ll want to read this.” —Po Bronson, New York Times–bestselling author of What Should I Do with My Life? and coauthor of NutureShock

“An eye-opening, epic journey of human devolution that explains why so many of us are sick and tired. A must-read book that exposes what our health care system doesn’t see.” —Dr. Steven Y. Park, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, author of Sleep, Interrupted

“I don’t say this often, but when I do I mean it: This book changed my life. Breath is part scientific quest, part historical insight, part Hero’s Journey, full of groundbreaking ideas, and a rollicking good read. I had no idea that the simple and intuitive act of inhaling and exhaling has taken such an evolutionary hit. As a result, I figured out why I sleep so badly and why my breathing feels so often out of sync. With a few simple tweaks, I fixed my breathing and fixed myself. A transformational book!” —Caroline Paul, bestselling author of The Gutsy Girl

Breath shows us just how extraordinary the act of breathing is and why so much depends on how we do it. An enthralling, surprising, and often funny adventure into our most overlooked and undervalued function.” —Bonnie Tsui, author of Why We Swim and American Chinatown

"A welcome, invigorating user’s manual for the respiratory system." — Kirkus Reviews

“If you want to read a book about the power of the breath, this is it!”—Patrick McKeown, bestselling author of The Oxygen Advantage

“Although we all breathe, there is an art and science to breathing correctly . . . Full of fascinating information an compelling arguments, this eye-opening (or more aptly a mouth-closing and nostril-opening) work is highly recommended.” — Library Journal

"This is the best book I''ve ever read! You won’t be able to put it down." —Dr. John Douillard DC CAP, elite trainer and author of Body, Mind, and Sport






About the Author

James Nestor has written for  OutsideScientific AmericanThe AtlanticDwellThe New York Times, and many other publications. His book  Deep: Freediving, Renegade Science, and What the Ocean Tells Us About Ourselves was a finalist for the 2015 PEN/ESPN Award for Literary Sports Writing, an Amazon Best Science Book of 2014, and more. Nestor has appeared on dozens of national television shows, including ABC’s  Nightline and CBS’s  Morning News, and on NPR. He lives and breathes in San Francisco.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

One

 

The Worst Breathers in the Animal Kingdom

 

The patient arrived, pale and torpid, at 9:32 a.m. Male, middle-aged, 175 pounds. Talkative and friendly but visibly anxious. Pain: none. Fatigue: a little. Level of anxiety: moderate. Fears about progression and future symptoms: high.

 

Patient reported that he was raised in a modern suburban environment, bottle-fed at six months, and weaned onto jarred commercial foods. The lack of chewing associated with this soft diet stunted bone development in his dental arches and sinus cavity, leading to chronic nasal congestion.

 

By age 15, patient was subsisting on even softer, highly processed foods consisting mostly of white bread, sweetened fruit juices, canned vegetables, Steak-umms, Velveeta sandwiches, microwave taquitos, Hostess Sno Balls, and Reggie! bars. His mouth had become so underdeveloped it could not accommodate 32 permanent teeth; incisors and canines grew in crooked, requiring extractions, braces, retainers, and headgear to straighten. Three years of orthodontics made his small mouth even smaller, so his tongue no longer properly fit between his teeth. When he stuck it out, which he did often, visible imprints laced its sides, a precursor to snoring.

 

At 17, four impacted wisdom teeth were removed, which further decreased the size of his mouth while increasing his chances of developing the chronic nocturnal choking known as sleep apnea. As he aged into his 20s and 30s, his breathing became more labored and dysfunctional and his airways became more obstructed. His face would continue a vertical growth pattern that led to sagging eyes, doughy cheeks, a sloping forehead, and a protruding nose.

 

This atrophied, underdeveloped mouth, throat, and skull, unfortunately, belongs to me.

 

I''m lying on the examination chair in the Stanford Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Center looking at myself, looking into myself. For the past several minutes, Dr. Jayakar Nayak, a nasal and sinus surgeon, has been gingerly coaxing an endoscope camera through my right nasal cavity. He''s gone so deep into my head that it''s come out the other side, into my throat.

 

"Say eeee," he says. Nayak has a halo of black hair, square glasses, cushioned running shoes, and a white coat. But I''m not looking at his clothes, or his face. I''m wearing a pair of video goggles that are streaming a live feed of the journey through the rolling dunes, swampy marshes, and stalactites inside my severely damaged sinuses. I''m trying not to cough or choke or gag as that endoscope squirms a little farther down.

 

"Say eeee," Nayak repeats. I say it and watch as the soft tissue around my larynx, pink and fleshy and coated in slime, opens and closes like a stop-motion Georgia O''Keeffe flower.

 

This isn''t a pleasure cruise. Twenty-five sextillion molecules (that''s 250 with 20 zeros after it) take this same voyage 18 times a minute, 25,000 times a day. I''ve come here to see, feel, and learn where all this air is supposed to enter our bodies. And I''ve come to say goodbye to my nose for the next ten days.

 

For the past century, the prevailing belief in Western medicine was that the nose was more or less an ancillary organ. We should breathe out of it if we can, the thinking went, but if not, no problem. That''s what the mouth is for.

 

Many doctors, researchers, and scientists still support this position. Breathing tubes, mouthbreathing, and nasal breathing are all just means to the same end. There are 27 departments at the National Institute of Health devoted to lungs, eyes, skin disease, ears, and so on. The nose and sinuses aren''t represented in any of them.

 

Nayak finds this absurd. He is the chief of rhinology research at Stanford. He heads an internationally renowned laboratory focused entirely on understanding the hidden power of the nose. He''s found that those dunes, stalactites, and marshes inside the human head orchestrate a multitude of functions for the body. Vital functions. "Those structures are in there for a reason!" he told me earlier. Nayak has a special reverence for the nose, which he believes is greatly misunderstood and underappreciated. Which is why he''s so interested to see what happens to a body that functions without one. Which is what brought me here.

 

Starting today, I''ll spend the next quarter of a million breaths with silicone plugs blocking my nostrils and surgical tape over the plugs to stop even the faintest amount of air from entering or exiting my nose. I''ll breathe only through my mouth, a heinous experiment that will be exhausting and miserable, but has a clear point.

 

Forty percent of today''s population suffers from chronic nasal obstruction, and around half of us are habitual mouthbreathers, with females and children suffering the most. The causes are many: dry air to stress, inflammation to allergies, pollution to pharmaceuticals. But much of the blame, I''ll soon learn, can be placed on the ever-shrinking real estate in the front of the human skull.

 

When mouths don''t grow wide enough, the roof of the mouth tends to rise up instead of out, forming what''s called a V-shape or high-arched palate. The upward growth impedes the development of the nasal cavity, shrinking it and disrupting the delicate structures in the nose. The reduced nasal space leads to obstruction and inhibits airflow. Overall, humans have the sad distinction of being the most plugged-up species on Earth.

 

I should know. Before probing my nasal cavities, Nayak took an X-ray of my head, which provided a deli-slicer view of every nook and cranny in my mouth, sinuses, and upper airways.

 

"You''ve got some . . . stuff," he said. Not only did I have a V-shape palate, I also had "severe" obstruction to the left nostril caused by a "severely" deviated septum. My sinuses were also riddled with a profusion of deformities called concha bullosa. "Super uncommon," said Nayak. It was a phrase nobody wants to hear from a doctor.

 

My airways were such a mess that Nayak was amazed I hadn''t suffered from even more of the infections and respiration problems I''d known as a kid. But he was reasonably certain I could expect some degree of serious breathing problems in the future.

 

Over the next ten days of forced mouthbreathing, I''ll be putting myself inside a kind of mucousy crystal ball, amplifying and hastening the deleterious effects on my breathing and my health, which will keep getting worse as I get older. I''ll be lulling my body into a state it already knows, that half the population knows, only multiplying it many times.

 

"OK, hold steady," Nayak says. He grabs a steel needle with a wire brush at the end. It''s the size of a mascara brush. I''m thinking, He''s not going to put that thing up my nose. A few seconds later, he puts that up my nose.

 

I watch through the video goggles as Nayak maneuvers the brush deeper. He keeps sliding until the brush is no longer up my nose, no longer playing around my nose hair, but wiggling inside of my head a few inches deep. "Steady, steady," he says.

 

When the nasal cavity gets congested, airflow decreases and bacteria flourish. These bacteria replicate and can lead to infections and colds and more congestion. Congestion begets congestion, which gives us no other option but to habitually breathe from the mouth. Nobody knows how soon this damage occurs. Nobody knows how quickly bacteria accumulate in an obstructed nasal cavity. Nayak needs to grab a culture of my deep nasal tissue to find out.

 

I wince as I watch him twist the brush deeper still, then spin it, skimming off a layer of gunk. The nerves this far up the nose are designed to feel the subtle flow of air and slight modulations in air temperature, not steel brushes. Even though he''s dabbed an anesthetic in there, I can still feel it. My brain has a hard time knowing exactly what to do, how to react. It''s difficult to explain, but it feels like someone is needling a conjoined twin that exists somewhere outside of my own head.

 

"The things you never thought you''d be doing with your life," Nayak laughs, putting the bleeding tip of the brush into a test tube. He''ll compare the 200,000 cells from my sinuses with another sample ten days from now to see how nasal obstruction affects bacterial growth. He shakes the test tube, hands it to his assistant, and politely asks me to take the video goggles off and make room for his next patient.

 

Patient #2 is leaning against the window and snapping photos with his phone. He''s 49 years old, deeply tanned with white hair and Smurf-blue eyes, and he''s wearing spotless beige jeans and leather loafers without socks. His name is Anders Olsson, and he''s flown 5,000 miles from Stockholm, Sweden. Along with me, he''s ponied up more than $5,000 to join the experiment.

 

I''d interviewed Olsson several months ago after coming across his website. It had all the red flags of flakiness: stock images of blond women striking hero poses on mountaintops, neon colors, frantic use of exclamation points, and bubble fonts. But Olsson wasn''t some fringe character. He''d spent ten years collecting and conducting serious scientific research. He''d written dozens of posts and self-published a book explaining breathing from the subatomic level on up, all annotated with hundreds of studies. He''d also become one of Scandinavia''s most respected and popular breathing therapists, helping to heal thousands of patients through the subtle power of healthy breathing.

 

When I mentioned during one of our Skype conversations that I would be mouthbreathing for ten days during an experiment, he cringed. When I asked if he wanted to join in, he refused. "I do not want to," he declared. "But I am curious."

 

Now, months later, Olsson plops his jet-lagged body into the examination chair, puts on the video glasses, and inhales one of his last nasal breaths for the next 240 hours. Beside him, Nayak twirls the stainless-steel endoscope the way a heavy metal drummer handles a drumstick. "OK, lean your head back," says Nayak. A twist of the wrist, a crane of the neck, and he goes deep.

 

The experiment is set up in two phases. Phase I consists of plugging our noses and attempting to live our everyday lives. We''ll eat, exercise, and sleep as usual, only we''ll do it while breathing only through our mouths. In Phase II, we''ll eat, drink, exercise, and sleep like we did during Phase I, but we''ll switch the pathway and breathe through our noses and practice a number of breathing techniques throughout the day.

 

Between phases we''ll return to Stanford and repeat all the tests we''ve just taken: blood gases, inflammatory markers, hormone levels, smell, rhinometry, pulmonary function, and more. Nayak will compare data sets and see what, if anything, changed in our brains and bodies as we shifted our style of breathing.

 

I''d gotten a fair share of gasps from friends when I told them about the experiment. "Don''t do it!" a few yoga devotees warned. But most people just shrugged. "I haven''t breathed out of my nose in a decade," said a friend who had suffered allergies most of his life. Everyone else said the equivalent of: What''s the big deal? Breathing is breathing.

 

Is it? Olsson and I will spend the next 20 days finding out.

 

. . .

 

A while back, some 4 billion years ago, our earliest ancestors appeared on some rocks. We were small then, a microscopic ball of sludge. And we were hungry. We needed energy to live and proliferate. So we found a way to eat air.

 

The atmosphere was mostly carbon dioxide then, not the best fuel, but it worked well enough. These early versions of us learned to take this gas in, break it down, and spit out what was left: oxygen. For the next billion years, the primordial goo kept doing this, eating more gas, making more sludge, and excreting more oxygen.

 

Then, around two and a half billion years ago, there was enough oxygen waste in the atmosphere that a scavenger ancestor emerged to make use of it. It learned to gulp in all that leftover oxygen and excrete carbon dioxide: the first cycle of aerobic life.

 

Oxygen, it turned out, produced 16 times more energy than carbon dioxide. Aerobic life forms used this boost to evolve, to leave the sludge-covered rocks behind and grow larger and more complex. They crawled up to land, dove deep into the sea, and flew into the air. They became plants, trees, birds, bees, and the earliest mammals.

 

Mammals grew noses to warm and purify the air, throats to guide air into lungs, and a network of sacs that would remove oxygen from the atmosphere and transfer it into the blood. The aerobic cells that once clung to swampy rocks so many eons ago now made up the tissues in mammalian bodies. These cells took oxygen from our blood and returned carbon dioxide, which traveled back through the veins, through the lungs, and into the atmosphere: the process of breathing.

 

The ability to breathe so efficiently in a wide variety of ways-consciously and unconsciously; fast, slow, and not at all-allowed our mammal ancestors to catch prey, escape predators, and adapt to different environments.

 

It was all going so well until about 1.5 million years ago, when the pathways through which we took in and exhaled air began to shift and fissure. It was a shift that, much later in history, would affect the breathing of every person on Earth.

 

I''d been feeling these cracks for much of my life, and chances are you have, too: stuffy noses, snoring, some degree of wheezing, asthma, allergies, and the rest. I''d always thought they were a normal part of being human. Nearly everyone I knew suffered from one problem or another.

 

But I came to learn that these problems didn''t randomly develop. Something caused them. And the answers could be found in a common and homely human trait.

 

 

A few months before the Stanford experiment, I flew to Philadelphia to visit Dr. Marianna Evans, an orthodontist and dental researcher whoÕd spent the last several years looking into the mouths of human skulls, both ancient and modern. We were standing in the basement of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, surrounded by several hundred specimens. Each was engraved with letters and numbers and stamped with its ÒraceÓ: Bedouin, Copt, Arab of Egypt, Negro Born in Africa. There were Brazilian prostitutes, Arab slaves, and Persian prisoners. The most famous specimen, I was told, came from an Irish prisoner whoÕd been hanged in 1824 for killing and eating fellow convicts.

 

The skulls ranged from 200 to thousands of years old. They were part of the Morton Collection, named after a racist scientist named Samuel Morton, who, starting in the 1830s, collected skeletons in a failed attempt to prove the superiority of the Caucasian race. The only positive outcome of Morton''s work is the skulls he spent two decades gathering, which now provide a snapshot of how people used to look and breathe.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
13,773 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Heather
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What a story! Filled with inaccuracies
Reviewed in the United States on June 11, 2020
It’s true, this book is a fast, fun read, BUT I caught numerous inaccuracies from a whole host of topics (and I am not even well read on the subject) which makes me question what- if ANYTHING -is true. Examples range from stating that plants exchange oxygen for carbon... See more
It’s true, this book is a fast, fun read, BUT I caught numerous inaccuracies from a whole host of topics (and I am not even well read on the subject) which makes me question what- if ANYTHING -is true.
Examples range from stating that plants exchange oxygen for carbon dioxide (it’s the opposite and how it’s believed oxygen came about in the earths atmosphere) to deoxygenated blood appears blue (again incorrect, deoxygenated blood is deep red, veins appear blue due to reflection of light through the skin). Even cultural references were incorrect which makes me question could this author even use google? I am only 25% through the book- did this guy just try and bang out this book for the cash? It’s a fun read, written by someone who thinks he knows what he’s talking about- so if you do decide to spend the time, perhaps read with a skeptical eye. And it’s dangerous because it’s marketed as this person actually knows what he’s talking about (he spent a year researching so you think he would have been trustworthy). It’s unfortunate that this book was so hastily thrown together...given that the author says numerous times that breathing in any form to the respected western medical community is the same when he’s arguing the opposite point. He’s argument would be a lot more valid had he taken the time to fact check, review, and get basic things most learn in high school correct.
1,683 people found this helpful
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Peter J. Brock
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Everything you''ve never wanted to learn about the process of "Breathing"
Reviewed in the United States on May 29, 2020
If you have the patience you will scan through 230 plus pages of trivia spanning from evolution to the present and including numerous specious studies including one through which the author and his buddy Olssen suffered and finally learn that being a mouth breather is not... See more
If you have the patience you will scan through 230 plus pages of trivia spanning from evolution to the present and including numerous specious studies including one through which the author and his buddy Olssen suffered and finally learn that being a mouth breather is not healthy. BREATHE THROUGH YOUR NOSE!!!!!!
574 people found this helpful
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Me
1.0 out of 5 stars
So much BS in so few pages
Reviewed in the United States on June 15, 2020
I got half way through this book before I had to stop. So many of the claims in this book are completely not backed up by science at all. Cure scoliosis by breathing through your nose? Also breathing through your nose will also supposedly cure ADHD! Scientists have been... See more
I got half way through this book before I had to stop. So many of the claims in this book are completely not backed up by science at all. Cure scoliosis by breathing through your nose? Also breathing through your nose will also supposedly cure ADHD! Scientists have been baffled for decades and apparently all the patients had to do is nose breath. Give me a break.

I tried to investigate several claims such as this gem:
"In the 1980s, researchers with the Framingham Study, a 70-year longitudinal research program focused on heart disease, attempted to find out if lung size really did correlate to longevity. They gathered two decades of data from 5,200 subjects, crunched the numbers, and discovered that the greatest indicator of life span wasn’t genetics, diet, or the amount of daily exercise, as many had suspected. It was lung capacity."
The sources cited for this claim do not AT ALL support what the author is suggesting. I could not find any mention that lung capacity has a greater impact on life span than exercise and diet. In fact even looking at the authors cited source, I couldn''t even find the words "lung capacity" mentioned at all!

The author even goes further to claim that breathing through your nose will improve your exercise performance. Somehow Olympic athletes all over the world have yet to crack this one... Usain Bolt and Courtney Dewaulter must be doing it wrong.

I really wanted to like this book and learn something new, but there is soooo much unfounded bologna in here. It may be true that there are benefits to different breathing techniques, but the author has done an incredible job of hiding needles of truth in a hay pile of BS. You''re better of skipping this one.
577 people found this helpful
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Adam Fisher
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Changed my life!
Reviewed in the United States on May 26, 2020
This book changed my life more than any book since... Born to Run back in 2009? It''s full of amazing information, super fun to read, and is, like I said, life-changing. I snore a bit, my endurance is less than I''d like, and often I find myself just a bit low on energy. What... See more
This book changed my life more than any book since... Born to Run back in 2009? It''s full of amazing information, super fun to read, and is, like I said, life-changing. I snore a bit, my endurance is less than I''d like, and often I find myself just a bit low on energy. What this book taught me was that all things are connected! It''s the breath (obviously). What''s more, through a few simple exercises all of it can be safely and easily cured. Why didn''t my doctor tell me this? It''s all in here... and it works! I literally feel better because I bought and read this book.
Plus, the book is really just a lot of fun to read. It''s a worthy worthy follow up to Nestor''s last book, DEEP, and this one just gets deeper and wierder and even more full of adventure. My favorite part is the chapter about how the human skull has changed over the last couple hundred years because of changes in how we breath. It could have been really boring -- but Nestor doesn''t just write about it, he actually goes to Paris, crawls into a sewer, and breaks into the secret catacombs below the city to actually hold a hundreds of year old skull Hamlet-style. ("Alas poor Yorik..." &c. ) You actually see the skull and how they change! Unforgettable stuff. IMHO The book is a must read and must buy...
421 people found this helpful
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Dan Williams
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A life changer for me
Reviewed in the United States on May 30, 2020
I am in my mid-60s. As a former competitive athlete I was seeing a lot of the normal, as in average person nowadays, degradations of my quality of life. Additionally, like many people, I’ve been spending a lot more time in front of a screen. By one or 2 o’clock in the... See more
I am in my mid-60s. As a former competitive athlete I was seeing a lot of the normal, as in average person nowadays, degradations of my quality of life. Additionally, like many people, I’ve been spending a lot more time in front of a screen. By one or 2 o’clock in the afternoon, naptime. In the first week since buying the book I haven’t gotten sleepy mid afternoon. The book is well researched, a great read story wise, and contains valuable exercises. I can’t recommend this book enough.
303 people found this helpful
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Kelly Niland
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mind Altered, Possibly Blown
Reviewed in the United States on May 27, 2020
This book is the ultimate interactive experience, in that I found myself literally breathing differently, both while and since reading it. It’s impossible not to, after learning among countless other bonkers facts that the best indicator of one''s lifespan isn’t our genetics... See more
This book is the ultimate interactive experience, in that I found myself literally breathing differently, both while and since reading it. It’s impossible not to, after learning among countless other bonkers facts that the best indicator of one''s lifespan isn’t our genetics or our diet and exercise, but the way we breathe and our resulting lung capacity. And yet, the content isn''t scary in Nestor''s telling. To the contrary—it''s conversational, often amusing, and in the end, empowering. Hard to put a book down when it may actually improve and extend your life.
254 people found this helpful
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Tom C.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book is the key to fixing "Health Care" by addressing and correcting the cause of disease.
Reviewed in the United States on July 19, 2020
I am a 75 year old dentist, in practice for 50 years, the last 20 of which have been devoted to improving our patients'' oral health and total bodily health by addressing their structural, functional and behavioral problems caused by impaired growth and development of their... See more
I am a 75 year old dentist, in practice for 50 years, the last 20 of which have been devoted to improving our patients'' oral health and total bodily health by addressing their structural, functional and behavioral problems caused by impaired growth and development of their jaws , faces, and airways, resulting in dysfunctional breathing, chewing, and swallowing..... and a myriad of health problems that are mostly managed by medications from their physicians rather than addressing and correcting the cause. The lines between dentistry and medicine are getting blurrier every day now. James Nestor''s great book will help move this change forward, to the benefit of everyone. He obviously didn''t do all this work for the money. He was on a quest and is now sharing what he learned and how it helped him personally with everyone who will read this book.

Our interdisciplinary team is part of a growing movement in our profession which embraces the principles in James Nestor''s book and applies them daily with positive measurable and documentable improvement and elimination of as many as 20 symptoms of chronic inflammatory disease processes including hypertension, anxiety, depression, chronic fatigue syndrome, upper airway resistance/snoring, obstructive sleep apnea, gastrointestinal disorders, obesity, atopic dermatitis, tmj pain, neck pain, poor posture and, yes, ADHD, which is almost always related to mouth breathing and poor quantity and quality of sleep.

Oddly, this movement is not being led by physicians but by a growing group of enlightened dentists who, once they''ve seen the truth, can no longer ignore what''s been right there before our noses for so long, used to be part of dental and medical treatment, somehow faded after WWII, and finally is back in full flower, with science to support what''s wrong and how to fix it.

Thanks to our movement, The American Dental Association has now mandated that every dentist should screen every new patient of any age, especially young children, for disordered breathing. This is the future of Health Care, and the future is now..

For the first time in our history, a child born today will not live as long as its parents. We are breeding ourselves to extinction due to the post-industrial cultural changes beginning about 500 years ago with regards to proper diet, starting with lack of breast feeding. These changes, due to Epigenetic alteration of the expression of DNA, have now, as Nestor accurately states, have now become inheritable traits. All based on science.

The flattening of our faces with incompetent jaws and airways, is the most rapid change in the evolutionary history of Homo Sapiens.
The book and his website contain 500 references to science supporting what he says and what we''re now doing on a daily basis to improve the health and quality of life of ourselves, our families, our friends, and our patients.
His book is a great public service in spreading awareness of the TRUTH.

We''ve been hoping for years that someone exactly like James Nestor would come along without a conflict of interest and with the speaking and writing skills and the knowledge and charisma to take this message virally to the public, which will in turn demand that their health care providers forget their education and open their minds to this truth. Every dentist and physician should read this book. Anyone who snores or has a child or spouse who snores should read this book. Mothers, grandmothers, and wives should read this book as they are the Noticers and Motivators for family members who need help and don''t know where to get it.

Nestor asked basic questions to try to understand and correct his own breathing problems and went on a search for the answers, following the exact trail (and more) of evidence and anthropology and knowledge that has brought our movement to where we are today. He ended up in the office of Dr. Ted Belfor, who provided him with a Homeoblock appliance which he wore nightly with his mouth taped for a year while working on naso-diaphragmatic breathing. He now breathes better, has more endurance, feels better, and has a more symmetrical face as shown in CT scans made before and after his self-treatment.

I know exactly how this helped him, because I treated myself at age 68 with the same regime with Homeoblocks designed for me by Dr. Belfor. Our education taught us that growing bone in the human face was impossible after age 30. Colleagues told me I was just wasting my time. This is the same contempt before investigation seen in some of the negative reviews of his book on Amazon. This happens with all revolutionary ideas... First rejected, then violently opposed, then finally accepted as the truth after years, according to Schopenhauer and Jules Verne, the futurist of his generation.

We made CT scans and facial photographs and casts of my teeth and jaws and sleep breathing recordings before and after my 18 month self-treatment, so that any positive changes could be measured and documented. I was a typical chronic mouth breather with poor head and shoulder posture. I had Central Sleep Apnea, caused by over-exhalation of CO2, as he discusses. I would just quit breathing during sleep until my CO2 levels got high enough to enable proper Oxygen transport to my body and brain.

I had chronic respiratory illness and exzema as a child and was obese, topping out at 290 pounds at age 18. 5 hospitalizations and 3 surgeries for Crohn''s Disease. Stroke in my 40s .Advanced heart failure with permanent atrial fibrillation despite implanted pacemaker-defibrillator. Chronic Atopic Dermatitis with some lesions on my ankles for more than 30 years. Anxiety, Depression, Fatigue. What did I have to lose by trying this unusual approach?
After 18 months with Homeoblocks, saline nasal spray before bed, mouth taped during sleep, and consciously working on posture, chewing, swallowing, and breathing through my nose with my mouth closed and my tongue in the roof of my mouth...

I went from 245 pounds to 198 pounds without dieting. Still there after 6 years. Blood pressure normalized. No Chron''s symptoms anymore. All my skin lesions have completely healed. Better attitude and energy. More symmetrical face with measurable growth in all three dimensions in my airway and face. I''d call this something of miracle, and having lived it, we now use these same principles every day and have scores of documented case studies that show how successful it can be to help folks learn to breathe 24/7/365 from their noses and diaphragms while also improving their chewing and swallowing functions and behaviors.

Nestor is a gift to us. This book and his appearances are the key to spreading the truth nationally and internationally so that the public can grasp this information and lead to a tidal wave of sea change in
our current broken system of "sick care" as it becomes true Health Care by focusing on the importance of nasal breathing from the cradle to the grave. Six Stars!
186 people found this helpful
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John
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A fascinating read
Reviewed in the United States on May 28, 2020
When I think of my own health the first things that come to mind are diet and exercise. Breathing has been something I take for granted, just something my body does without me having to think about it. “Breath” has made me reconsider everything I have ever thought about my... See more
When I think of my own health the first things that come to mind are diet and exercise. Breathing has been something I take for granted, just something my body does without me having to think about it. “Breath” has made me reconsider everything I have ever thought about my health and longevity.

The ideas presented in this book make so much sense that I often found myself wondering “why didn’t I think about that?”. We are constantly breathing and we can control how we do it. How can it not affect our health? Mr. Nestor does a great job combining the latest scientific evidence with the knowledge earlier cultures understood about breathing and put into practice in their own lives. The result is a compelling argument that breathing is something that we have overlooked for too long and need to pay more attention to.
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Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Incoherent
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 28, 2020
This book is a collection of anecdotes and pseudo science about breathing. These range from insubstantial; a man in the 1930''s met another man who''d benefited from visiting Tibetan monks who breath through their noses. To plausible; anxiety can be controlled with breathing,...See more
This book is a collection of anecdotes and pseudo science about breathing. These range from insubstantial; a man in the 1930''s met another man who''d benefited from visiting Tibetan monks who breath through their noses. To plausible; anxiety can be controlled with breathing, strengthening the chest muscles and diaphram can help with breathing (eg. physiotherapy is good for people with emphysema). To mystical; breathing can infuse the body with a magical ''energy'' called Prana. Any conclusions seem to be contradictory: breath in little sips, take big breaths, reduce the amount of oxygen in our bodies, increase the amount etc. A lot is written concerning a study he and a friend took part in where they taped their noses shut for 10 days to force them to breath through their mouths. Apparently this will make you feel rotten, snore more and grow bacteria in your unused nasal cavity. Hardly surprising.
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Lady Fancifull
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Best book I have read on the subject – and I have read, and own, many
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 2, 2020
I have a professional, and also a personal, interest in the subject matter. I became an adult onset asthmatic quite some time ago, a category which has dramatically increased in the past 30-40 years, driven by levels of pollution and our love affair with the car. I had no...See more
I have a professional, and also a personal, interest in the subject matter. I became an adult onset asthmatic quite some time ago, a category which has dramatically increased in the past 30-40 years, driven by levels of pollution and our love affair with the car. I had no history at all of childhood eczema, asthma or hayfever, or indeed any parental family history of this. Triggers for me were a combination of enforced passive smoking for some decades, before it got banned in public places, and, finally prolonged exposure to a chemical in the workplace, which had a disastrous respiratory effect on all of us, so exposed Unwilling initially to take medication I tried to explore various ways to improve lung capacity, some of which have been more or less successful, though I had to surrender eventually to medical management, and am generally well maintained Covid has of course made us all intensely aware of lung health, and there has been an explosion in awareness of how we breathe, how this activity we might not even think about until we can’t, might impact, positively or negatively, health and wellbeing. Not to mention, how we might best recover long term if the virus takes hold and diminishes lung capacity long term. Decades ago, before it was more widely known, I had attempted to self-admiinister Buteyko, from a book. And not got on very well with it. James Nestor, a self-styled ‘aeronaut’ as he calls those who have deeply studied breathwork, and sought to educate and help others to breathe well, explores, clearly, so clearly, a whole range of extraordinary breathing techniques. I should probably rephrase that – they are not necessarily THAT extraordinary, they are representative of more natural, healthful ways of breathing – which almost all of us ‘grew out of’ – posture, diet , environment changes our breathing. Nestor goes well into the science of all this, and his book is absolutely fascinating. But what makes it outstanding for me is that he is a WRITER. Most of the other books I’ve read, share the passion, share the authors’ own journey and exploration of the field, but those writers don’t have the skill to convey the dryer stuff of the science so engagingly and absorbingly, or the light touch immediacy of writing which is like someone talking to you. For those who might be looking towards trying the various techniques, Nestor gives clear guidance within the book, - and yes, I found Buteyko so much easier to work, from this. He also promotes and explores several ‘aeronauts’ – Patrick McKeown (very much the approachable Buteyko international voice now) Anders Olsson, Wim Hof and others – and gives details and links to the wealth of video material out there. Indeed Nestor’s own website is full of wonderful, free resources. I also really like his pragmatic and generous approach. One of the biggest changes I’ve made – with excellent results – since reading this book, is to simply control how I breathe when sleeping. Nose breathing, not mouth breathing, is what we need to be doing, and though I have consciously tried to work with this, over many years, I certainly wasn’t doing this at night. Various complex devices are out on the market for this one – Nestor does talk them through, but also says he himself just uses simple micropore tape, to keep his mouth shut. It certainly looks a bit weird and startling but, I must say, since my first night with a small vertical strip from just above top lip to just below bottom lip, I not only had no trouble or discomfort with this, but no longer have a stuffy or runny nose on waking, and am more likely to sleep through the night, not needing to wake for a pee – and he explains the science behind this, a connection between a neurotransmitter, the autonomic nervous system, and depth of sleep. The nose is a wonderful thing, and the biochemistry of nose breathing and mouth breathing are different. Button that lip!
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strawdog
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The elusive obvious.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 10, 2020
Mr Nestor has produced a superbly readable, meticulous, and well-argued popular science book that deserves a wide audience. I confess that I am kicking myself for not taking the intricacies of breathing seriously until the last few years and I wonder if I would have been as...See more
Mr Nestor has produced a superbly readable, meticulous, and well-argued popular science book that deserves a wide audience. I confess that I am kicking myself for not taking the intricacies of breathing seriously until the last few years and I wonder if I would have been as dismissive if I had read a ''grounded'' a book as this, rather than texts that relied on ''New Age-y'' type language that provoked my prejudices and closed my mind to the undoubted benefits of ''breathwork''. In a concluding chapter, Mr Nestor forcefully states the benefits of Western medicine - and rightly so; the book is NOT opposed to the scientific method. What he does argue for, however, is that the Western model has ignored an elusive obvious: self-regulation of the breath as a means of stress reduction with a host of attendant benefits. In presenting his case, Mr Nestor takes the reader on a journey from the dawn of aerobic metabolism, through biological anthropology, into psychology, psychiatry, and dentistry, tying it all together with his own history of breath exploration as a means to control his own health issues. It is a dazzling read regardless of some passages that describe horrible animal experiments. There are appendices that describe some breathing techniques, along with bibliography and expanded notes. Mr Nestor''s website, with its dedicated ''Breath'' page, is worth a look for new updates. Anecdotally, I ''cured'' long-standing exercise-induced asthma through one of the methods outlined in the book (Buteyko) and I continue to dive into it to control a life-long anxiety disorder. From what I gather, my experience is commonplace, although the benefits have been quite startling on a personal level. Whether or not I experiment with the Wim Hof method discussed in the book is another matter; it may be the next step for me. All in all, this is a persuasive, well-researched, passionate, and inspiring book and I heartily recommend it.
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mr john kenny
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Life changer
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 1, 2020
Throughly enjoyed this book a great balance of fact and storytelling and lots of useful tips to help your breathing. As an asthmatic I have noticed significant improvements in my breathing after only a week of practicing. A must read for anyone with breathing difficulties.
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Matthew Schrock
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Breath works !!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 9, 2020
Brilliant book. 30 years in health care.....and this is one of the best books I''ve read. Trust the science and above all it works for me !!
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