Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, online and Insights for Managing discount Software People and Teams online sale

Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, online and Insights for Managing discount Software People and Teams online sale

Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, online and Insights for Managing discount Software People and Teams online sale
Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, online and Insights for Managing discount Software People and Teams online sale_top

Description

Product Description

The Essential Guide to Effectively Managing Developers So You Can Deliver Better Software―Now Extensively Updated

“Lichty and Mantle have assembled a guide that will help you hire, motivate, and mentor a software development team that functions at the highest level. Their rules of thumb and coaching advice form a great blueprint for new and experienced software engineering managers alike.”
―Tom Conrad, CTO, Pandora

“Reading this book’s nuggets felt like the sort of guidance that I would get from a trusted mentor. A mentor who I not only trusted, but one who trusted me to take the wisdom, understand its limits, and apply it correctly.”
―Mike Fauzy, CTO, FauzyLogic

Today, many software projects continue to run catastrophically over schedule and budget, and still don’t deliver what customers want. Some organizations conclude that software development can’t be managed well. But it can―and it starts with people. In their extensively updated Managing the Unmanageable, Second Edition, Mickey W. Mantle and Ron Lichty show how to hire and develop programmers, onboard new hires quickly and successfully, and build and nurture highly effective and productive teams.

Drawing on over 80 years of combined industry experience, the authors share Rules of Thumb, Nuggets of Wisdom, checklists, and other Tools for successfully leading programmers and teams, whether they’re co-located or dispersed worldwide. This edition adds extensive new Agile coverage, new approaches to recruitment and onboarding, expanded coverage of handling problem employees, and much more. Whether you’re new to software management or you’ve done it for years, you’ll find indispensable advice for handling your challenges and delivering outstanding software.
  • Find, recruit, and hire the right programmers, when you need them
  • Manage programmers as the individuals they are
  • Motivate software people and teams to accomplish truly great feats
  • Create a successful development subculture that can thrive even in a toxic company culture
  • Master the arts of managing down and managing up
  • Embrace your role as a manager who empowers self-directed agile teams to thrive and succeed

Register your book for convenient access to downloads, updates, and/or corrections as they become available. See inside book for details.

Review

Over 50 five-star reviews on Amazon.com (U.S.)!

“Lichty and Mantle have assembled a guide that will help you hire, motivate, and mentor a software development team that functions at the highest level. Their rules of thumb and coaching advice form a great blueprint for new and experienced software engineering managers alike.”
–Tom Conrad, CTO, Pandora

“I wish I’d had this material available years ago. I see lots and lots of ‘meat’ in here that I’ll use over and over again as I try to become a better manager. The writing style is right on, and I love the personal anecdotes.”
–Steve Johnson, Senior Architect, Inlet Digital

Managing the Unmanageable is a well-written, must-have reference book for anyone serious about building sustainable software teams that consistently deliver high-quality solutions that meet expectations. It is loaded with incredibly useful and practical tips and tricks to deal with real-life situations commonly encountered by software managers anywhere in the world. It tearlessly peels back the onion layers of the process of managing software developers–whether a handful of co-located programmers or thousands dispersed across the world–through a balance of battle-tested approaches and keen understanding of the various personalities and backgrounds of software team members. Finally, a book on software engineering that focuses on the manager’s dilemma of making a team of programmers work efficiently together. Every single software manager should have it on their bookshelf.”
–Phac Le Tuan, CTO, Reepeet, and CEO, PaceWorks

“Becoming a great engineering leader requires more than technical know-how; Ron and Mickey’s book provides a practical cookbook for the important softer side of engineering leadership, which can be applied to any software development organization.”
–Paul Melmon, VP of Engineering, NICE Systems

“EXCELLENT. Well-structured, logical, filled with great personal color and many little gems. You guys have done a great job here. Terrific balance between theory and practice, rich with info.”
–Joe Kleinschmidt, CEO, Obindo, former CTO, Leverage Software

“I started reading the nuggets section and it took fewer than four pages to improve my thinking. What struck me about the nuggets was that I could sense the genesis of this book: two masters of their craft learning from each other. Most books feel like a teacher describing a sterile version of what ‘ought to be done’ that leaves you wondering, ‘Will this work in the “real world”?’ Reading the nuggets felt like the sort of guidance that I would get from a trusted mentora–a mentor who I not only trusted, but one who trusted me to take the wisdom, understand its limits, and apply it correctly. It’s concentrated like a Reader’s Digest for technical management wisdom.”
–Mike Fauzy, CTO, FauzyLogic

Managing the Unmanageable is a great collection of sometimes-obvious and sometimes-not-obvious guidance for software managers. I wish that I had had this book when I first started managing teams, and it still is illuminating. For programmers who step into management, the hardest thing is to learn the soft skills. Ron and Mickey do a great job of illustrating not just the why but also the how.”
–Bill Hofmann, VP of Engineering, Klamr.to

“Unique dialogue around the human aspects of software development that is very much overdue.”
–Mart Friedman, CEO and founder, Greenaxle Solutions

“The advice provided herein about what to do on a new employee’s first day of work seems unique and very helpful!”
–Steven Flannes, PhD, author, People Skills 3.0: Next-Generation Leadership Skills for Project Success

“I just wish that I had this book when I started as a first-time manager five years ago!”
–Kinnar Vora, VP, Product Development and Operations, Sequoia Retail Systems

“The book provides insight to a unique group of people: programmers. Companies around the planet have struggled and are still struggling with how to best develop software products. Managing programmers is at the heart of developing software products successfully. Many project and organization leaders are ill-equipped to deal with programmers and software development in general. I think this book can bring insight to leaders of software organizations and help them understand and even get inside the head of programmers and therefore be more effective leaders.”
–Michael Maitland, CEO (geek-in-charge), WhereTheGeeksRoam

“I have enjoyed reading the book very much, and I wish I had it ten years ago–probably would have saved me from making certain mistakes. A lot of what I read is not new to me, but I have never seen so much relevant material assembled in one place. This book was just what I needed. I already feel that I’ve benefited from it.”
–David Vydra, Continuous Delivery Advocate and Software Craftsman, TestDriven.com

“I found the book very helpful. It heightened my sensitivity to my staff, even having managed for decades.”
–Margo Kannenberg, Assistant Director, Application Development, HighWire Press

“Mickey was my manager in my first role as programming manager. His real-world, pragmatic, hands-on guidance was a profound positive influence on everything I’ve ever done with management since. His is still my go-to advice as I develop and mentor managers. I’m pleased that he’s taken the time to canonize it in this book so that many more new and experienced managers can benefit from it.”
–H. B. Siegel, Director, Amazon.com

“Mantle and Lichty cut through abstract principles and present proven techniques that can increase the effectiveness of software development organizations. This book deserves a place on the real (or virtual) bookshelf of every software manager who wants to build an outstanding development team and create a culture where everyone enjoys coming to work. It’s especially valuable in telling managers what not to do, and how to address the inevitable problems that affect all organizations.”
–Anthony I. (Tony) Wasserman, Professor of Software Management Practice, Carnegie Mellon University–Silicon Valley; ACM Fellow; and IEEE Life Fellow

“Mickey was there on Long Island in the mid-1970s when the group now known as Pixar first formed, delivering successful software products then, and was still doing so, as manager, almost two decades later at Pixar itself. He knows what he’s talking about.”
–Alvy Ray Smith, cofounder of Pixar

“Ron and Mickey clearly understand how important it is for programmers to work on projects that make a difference and how essential it is for managers to create and foster a unique and innovative culture.”
–Kathy Baldanza, VPE, Perforce Software

“This book is a treasure trove of real-world experiences that will make you a more effective software development manager.”
–Chris Richardson, founder of the original CloudFoundry.com, and author of POJOs in Action

About the Author

Mickey W. Mantle has been developing software for more than forty years as a software and hardware product creator, manager, and executive for companies that include Evans & Sutherland, Pixar, Broderbund, and Gracenote. He currently develops mobile/tablet applications, writes, and consults.

Ron Lichty has been developing software for thirty years, most of them as a programming manager, director of development, and vice president of products and engineering for companies that include Apple, Fujitsu, Razorfish, and Schwab. He has written four books and hundreds of articles. He consults with startups and companies large and small to unravel the knots in software development and make it hum.

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