The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale
The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale__below
The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale__left
The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale__right
The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale__front
The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale__after

Minimal signs of wear. May have markings or highlights.
See more
Sold by LiquidationFactor and fulfilled by Amazon.
[{"displayPrice":"$10.71","priceAmount":10.71,"currencySymbol":"$","integerValue":"10","decimalSeparator":".","fractionalValue":"71","symbolPosition":"left","hasSpace":false,"showFractionalPartIfEmpty":true,"offerListingId":"F9V83lAslh0yYLU%2BBUocjoPf5u3MwVJX2YtGNNI%2FPvqh5OuMFJjccyxcatjcjZt21hLu47enEg98xco9SqjN0e8aFf%2BZWWDt%2BQx1osHF2Cb0hs9uyI4RqKy94X68qn474z8Oc%2FRHmBg7%2BvveLtRMXg%3D%3D","locale":"en-US","buyingOptionType":"NEW"},{"displayPrice":"$6.86","priceAmount":6.86,"currencySymbol":"$","integerValue":"6","decimalSeparator":".","fractionalValue":"86","symbolPosition":"left","hasSpace":false,"showFractionalPartIfEmpty":true,"offerListingId":"F9V83lAslh0yYLU%2BBUocjoPf5u3MwVJXTdSF1JunIyPVTvASYbOO2eDT7Xoc1yopoyBPysvMSB%2BqBfVaQIVzb%2BIABK3xKVX%2B8c%2FkGvWF9dje%2FXLjKY%2BlYO8XJ21dNgeFOI0IPPqGm2%2Fvq5hBHKb2HHg8iEdtInHBPlFJStztAOPlRxH2t17Zed%2BRbGRFuJKC","locale":"en-US","buyingOptionType":"USED"}]
$$10.71 () Includes selected options. Includes initial monthly payment and selected options. Details
Price
Subtotal
$$10.71
Subtotal
Initial payment breakdown
Shipping cost, delivery date, and order total (including tax) shown at checkout.
ADD TO LIST
Available at a lower price from other sellers that may not offer free Prime shipping.
SELL ON AMAZON
Share this product with friends
Text Message
WhatsApp
Copy
press and hold to copy
Email
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Loading your book clubs
There was a problem loading your book clubs. Please try again.
Not in a club? Learn more
Join or create book clubs
Choose books together
Track your books
Bring your club to Amazon Book Clubs, start a new book club and invite your friends to join, or find a club that’s right for you for free. Explore Amazon Book Clubs
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Frequently bought together

+
+
Choose items to buy together.
Buy all three: $29.73
$10.71
$10.74
$8.28
Total price:
To see our price, add these items to your cart.
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Book details

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Description

Product Description

The years-long New York Times bestseller and major motion picture from Spielberg’s Dreamworks is “irresistible…seductive…with a high concept plot that keeps you riveted from the first page” ( O, The Oprah Magazine).

After four harrowing years on the Western Front, Tom Sherbourne returns to Australia and takes a job as the lighthouse keeper on Janus Rock, nearly half a day’s journey from the coast. To this isolated island, where the supply boat comes once a season, Tom brings a young, bold, and loving wife, Isabel. Years later, after two miscarriages and one stillbirth, the grieving Isabel hears a baby’s cries on the wind. A boat has washed up onshore carrying a dead man and a living baby.

Tom, who keeps meticulous records and whose moral principles have withstood a horrific war, wants to report the man and infant immediately. But Isabel insists the baby is a “gift from God,” and against Tom’s judgment, they claim her as their own and name her Lucy. When she is two, Tom and Isabel return to the mainland and are reminded that there are other people in the world. Their choice has devastated one of them.

Review

"Irresistible...seductive...a high concept plot that keeps you riveted from the first page." —Sara Nelson, O, the Oprah magazine

“An extraordinary and heart-rending book about good people, tragic decisions and the beauty found in each of them.” —Markus Zusak, author of The Book Thief

“M.L. Stedman’s The Light Between Oceans is a beautiful novel about isolation and courage in the face of enormous loss. It gets into your heart stealthily, until you stop hoping the characters will make different choices and find you can only watch, transfixed, as every conceivable choice becomes an impossible one. I couldn’t look away from the page and then I couldn’t see it, through tears. It’s a stunning debut.” —Maile Meloy, author of Both Ways Is the Only Way I Want It

“M.L. Stedman, a spectacularly sure storyteller, swept me to a remote island nearly a century ago, where a lighthouse keeper and his wife make a choice that shatters many lives, including their own. This is a novel in which justice for one character means another’s tragic loss, and we care desperately for both. Reading The Light Between Oceans is a total-immersion experience, extraordinarily moving.” —Monica Ali, author of Brick Lane and Untold Story

“Haunting...Stedman draws the reader into her emotionally complex story right from the beginning, with lush descriptions of this savage and beautiful landscape, and vivid characters with whom we can readily empathize. Hers is a stunning and memorable debut.” Booklist, starred review

“[Stedman sets] the stage beautifully to allow for a heart-wrenching moral dilemma to play out... Most impressive is the subtle yet profound maturation of Isabel and Tom as characters.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The miraculous arrival of a child in the life of a barren couple delivers profound love but also the seeds of destruction. Moral dilemmas don’t come more exquisite than the one around which Australian novelist Stedman constructs her debut.” Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“This heartbreaking debut from M L Stedman is a gem of a book that you''ll have trouble putting down” Good Housekeeping

“This fine, suspenseful debut explores desperation, morality, and loss, and considers the damaging ways in which we store our private sorrows, and the consequences of such terrible secrets.” Martha Stewart Whole Living

“As time passes the harder the decision becomes to undo and the more towering is its impact. This is the story of its terrible consequences. But it is also a description of the extraordinary, sustaining power of a marriage to bind two people together in love, through the most emotionally harrowing circumstances.” —Victoria Moore, The Daily Mail

About the Author

M.L. Stedman was born and raised in Western Australia and now lives in London. The Light Between Oceans is her first novel.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Light Between Oceans


16th December 1918

Yes, I realize that,” Tom Sherbourne said. He was sitting in a spartan room, barely cooler than the sultry day outside. The Sydney summer rain pelted the window, and sent the people on the pavement scurrying for shelter.

“I mean very tough.” The man across the desk leaned forward for emphasis. “It’s no picnic. Not that Byron Bay’s the worst posting on the Lights, but I want to make sure you know what you’re in for.” He tamped down the tobacco with his thumb and lit his pipe. Tom’s letter of application had told the same story as many a fellow’s around that time: born 28 September 1893; war spent in the Army; experience with the International Code and Morse; physically fit and well; honorable discharge. The rules stipulated that preference should be given to ex-servicemen.

“It can’t—” Tom stopped, and began again. “All due respect, Mr. Coughlan, it’s not likely to be tougher than the Western Front.”

The man looked again at the details on the discharge papers, then at Tom, searching for something in his eyes, in his face. “No, son. You’re probably right on that score.” He rattled off some rules: “You pay your own passage to every posting. You’re relief, so you don’t get holidays. Permanent staff get a month’s leave at the end of each three-year contract.” He took up his fat pen and signed the form in front of him. As he rolled the stamp back and forth across the inkpad he said, “Welcome”—he thumped it down in three places on the paper—“to the Commonwealth Lighthouse Service.” On the form, “16th December 1918” glistened in wet ink.



The six months’ relief posting at Byron Bay, up on the New South Wales coast, with two other keepers and their families, taught Tom the basics of life on the Lights. He followed that with a stint down on Maatsuyker, the wild island south of Tasmania where it rained most days of the year and the chickens blew into the sea during storms.

On the Lights, Tom Sherbourne has plenty of time to think about the war. About the faces, the voices of the blokes who had stood beside him, who saved his life one way or another; the ones whose dying words he heard, and those whose muttered jumbles he couldn’t make out, but who he nodded to anyway.

Tom isn’t one of the men whose legs trailed by a hank of sinews, or whose guts cascaded from their casing like slithering eels. Nor were his lungs turned to glue or his brains to stodge by the gas. But he’s scarred all the same, having to live in the same skin as the man who did the things that needed to be done back then. He carries that other shadow, which is cast inward.

He tries not to dwell on it: he’s seen plenty of men turned worse than useless that way. So he gets on with life around the edges of this thing he’s got no name for. When he dreams about those years, the Tom who is experiencing them, the Tom who is there with blood on his hands, is a boy of eight or so. It’s this small boy who’s up against blokes with guns and bayonets, and he’s worried because his school socks have slipped down and he can’t hitch them up because he’ll have to drop his gun to do it, and he’s barely big enough even to hold that. And he can’t find his mother anywhere.

Then he wakes and he’s in a place where there’s just wind and waves and light, and the intricate machinery that keeps the flame burning and the lantern turning. Always turning, always looking over its shoulder.

If he can only get far enough away—from people, from memory—time will do its job.



Thousands of miles away on the west coast, Janus Rock was the furthest place on the continent from Tom’s childhood home in Sydney. But Janus Light was the last sign of Australia he had seen as his troopship steamed for Egypt in 1915. The smell of the eucalypts had wafted for miles offshore from Albany, and when the scent faded away he was suddenly sick at the loss of something he didn’t know he could miss. Then, hours later, true and steady, the light, with its five-second flash, came into view—his homeland’s furthest reach—and its memory stayed with him through the years of hell that followed, like a farewell kiss. When, in June 1920, he got news of an urgent vacancy going on Janus, it was as though the light there were calling to him.

Teetering on the edge of the continental shelf, Janus was not a popular posting. Though its Grade One hardship rating meant a slightly higher salary, the old hands said it wasn’t worth the money, which was meager all the same. The keeper Tom replaced on Janus was Trimble Docherty, who had caused a stir by reporting that his wife was signaling to passing ships by stringing up messages in the colored flags of the International Code. This was unsatisfactory to the authorities for two reasons: first, because the Deputy Director of Lighthouses had some years previously forbidden signaling by flags on Janus, as vessels put themselves at risk by sailing close enough to decipher them; and secondly, because the wife in question was recently deceased.

Considerable correspondence on the subject was generated in triplicate between Fremantle and Melbourne, with the Deputy Director in Fremantle putting the case for Docherty and his years of excellent service, to a Head Office concerned strictly with efficiency and cost and obeying the rules. A compromise was reached by which a temporary keeper would be engaged while Docherty was given six months’ medical leave.

“We wouldn’t normally send a single man to Janus—it’s pretty remote and a wife and family can be a great practical help, not just a comfort,” the District Officer had said to Tom. “But seeing it’s only temporary… You’ll leave for Partageuse in two days,” he said, and signed him up for six months.



There wasn’t much to organize. No one to farewell. Two days later, Tom walked up the gangplank of the boat, armed with a kit bag and not much else. The SS Prometheus worked its way along the southern shores of Australia, stopping at various ports on its run between Sydney and Perth. The few cabins reserved for first-class passengers were on the upper deck, toward the bow. In third class, Tom shared a cabin with an elderly sailor. “Been making this trip for fifty years—they wouldn’t have the cheek to ask me to pay. Bad luck, you know,” the man had said cheerfully, then returned his attention to the large bottle of over-proof rum that kept him occupied. To escape the alcohol fumes, Tom took to walking the deck during the day. Of an evening there’d usually be a card game belowdecks.



You could still tell at a glance who’d been over there and who’d sat the war out at home. You could smell it on a man. Each tended to keep to his own kind. Being in the bowels of the vessel brought back memories of the troopships that took them first to the Middle East, and later to France. Within moments of arriving on board, they’d deduced, almost by an animal sense, who was an officer, who was lower ranks; where they’d been.

Just like on the troopships, the focus was on finding a bit of sport to liven up the journey. The game settled on was familiar enough: first one to score a souvenir off a first-class passenger was the winner. Not just any souvenir, though. The designated article was a pair of ladies’ drawers. “Prize money’s doubled if she’s wearing them at the time.”

The ringleader, a man by the name of McGowan, with a mustache, and fingers yellowed from his Woodbines, said he’d been chatting to one of the stewards about the passenger list: the choice was limited. There were ten cabins in all. A lawyer and his wife—best give them a wide berth; some elderly couples, a pair of old spinsters (promising), but best of all, some toff’s daughter traveling on her own.

“I reckon we can climb up the side and in through her window,” he announced. “Who’s with me?”

The danger of the enterprise didn’t surprise Tom. He’d heard dozens of such tales since he got back. Men who’d taken to risking their lives on a whim—treating the boom gates at level crossings as a gallop jump; swimming into rips to see if they could get out. So many men who had dodged death over there now seemed addicted to its lure. Still, this lot were free agents now. Probably just full of talk.



The following night, when the nightmares were worse than usual, Tom decided to escape them by walking the decks. It was two a.m. He was free to wander wherever he wanted at that hour, so he paced methodically, watching the moonlight leave its wake on the water. He climbed to the upper deck, gripping the stair rail to counter the gentle rolling, and stood a moment at the top, taking in the freshness of the breeze and the steadiness of the stars that showered the night.

Out of the corner of his eye, he saw a glimmer come on in one of the cabins. Even first-class passengers had trouble sleeping sometimes, he mused. Then, some sixth sense awoke in him—that familiar, indefinable instinct for trouble. He moved silently toward the cabin, and looked in through the window.

In the dim light, he saw a woman flat against the wall, pinned there even though the man before her wasn’t touching her. He was an inch away from her face, with a leer Tom had seen too often. He recognized the man from belowdecks, and remembered the prize. Bloody idiots. He tried the door, and it opened.

“Leave her alone,” he said as he stepped into the cabin. He spoke calmly, but left no room for debate.

The man spun around to see who it was, and grinned when he recognized Tom. “Christ! Thought you were a steward! You can give me a hand, I was just—”

“I said leave her alone! Clear out. Now.”

“But I haven’t finished. I was just going to make her day.” He reeked of drink and stale tobacco.

Tom put a hand on his shoulder, with a grip so hard that the man cried out. He was a good six inches shorter than Tom, but tried to take a swing at him all the same. Tom seized his wrist and twisted it. “Name and rank!”

“McKenzie. Private. 3277.” The unrequested serial number followed like a reflex.

“Private, you’ll apologize to this young lady and you’ll get back to your bunk and you won’t show your face on deck until we berth, you understand me?”

“Yes, sir!” He turned to the woman. “Beg your pardon, Miss. Didn’t mean any harm.”

Still terrified, the woman gave the slightest nod.

“Now, out!” Tom said, and the man, deflated by sudden sobriety, shuffled from the cabin.

“You all right?” Tom asked the woman.

“I—I think so.”

“Did he hurt you?”

“He didn’t…”—she was saying it to herself as much as to him—“he didn’t actually touch me.”

He took in the woman’s face—her gray eyes seemed calmer now. Her dark hair was loose, in waves down to her arms, and her fists still gathered her nightgown to her neck. Tom reached for her dressing gown from a hook on the wall and draped it over her shoulders.

“Thank you,” she said.

“Must have got an awful fright. I’m afraid some of us aren’t used to civilized company these days.”

She didn’t speak.

“You won’t get any more trouble from him.” He righted a chair that had been overturned in the encounter. “Up to you whether you report him, Miss. I’d say he’s not the full quid now.”

Her eyes asked a question.

“Being over there changes a man. Right and wrong don’t look so different any more to some.” He turned to go, but put his head back through the doorway. “You’ve got every right to have him up on charges if you want. But I reckon he’s probably got enough troubles. Like I said—up to you,” and he disappeared through the door.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.
UP NEXT
CANCEL
00:00
-00:00
Shop
Text Message
Email
Facebook
Twitter
WhatsApp
Pinterest
Share
More videos
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
21,412 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Melissa Deanna Locklair
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
In Real Life Not Every One Gets a Happy Ending and That''s Okay
Reviewed in the United States on September 11, 2016
I expected such a different ending because of the reviews I read on Amazon. I''ve never posted a review, but I felt a need to after reading those reviews. If you''re looking for a feel-good Nicholas Spark book, this won''t be it. Don''t give a book a poor review because it... See more
I expected such a different ending because of the reviews I read on Amazon. I''ve never posted a review, but I felt a need to after reading those reviews. If you''re looking for a feel-good Nicholas Spark book, this won''t be it. Don''t give a book a poor review because it isn''t. A book being a sad book doesn''t make it a bad book. Did I cry my eyes out at the end? Yep. I was on vacation on a beautiful beach, and I sobbed like a baby. I think that''s a sign of a great writer. The main characters are flawed people who make some bad decisions, but they also make some good decisions. That''s life. Who isn''t flawed? Who doesn''t made good and bad decisions? Some are just more flawed than others. Real life doesn''t always end with everyone getting what they want and in this book that''s how it goes.I truly thought the writing was wonderful and can''t wait for another book by the writer. I highly recommend this if you aren''t into fluff pieces.
135 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
S. VanhooseTop Contributor: Pets
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great read
Reviewed in the United States on November 4, 2017
This was a great book. I had just finished a REALLY great book right before picking this one up, so I found it slightly slow to start. But I soon got into it within the first few chapters. The writing style is very sweet and simple, I felt, and the descriptions let you... See more
This was a great book. I had just finished a REALLY great book right before picking this one up, so I found it slightly slow to start. But I soon got into it within the first few chapters. The writing style is very sweet and simple, I felt, and the descriptions let you really feel like you are there. The author does a fabulous job of getting the reader involved with the characters and feeling what they feel.

As a trigger warning, I highly suggest that any woman who has had difficult miscarriages and/or has had trouble conceiving think twice before reading this book. I can imagine that this would be an extremely emotional read for someone like that. Reader beware. It is sobering enough for someone who has never gone through that type of pain.

It’s actually a pretty realistic story, and gives the feeling that it could have really happened somewhere, at some time in the past. The neat thing about the ending is that it had a LOT of possibilities. The author did a good job of not letting you know what was up her sleeve for the end, and I found the last couple chapters somewhat anxiety-causing. Haha. At one point I think I did actually flip to the back (which I have a pretty strict rule for myself that I do NOT usually allow myself to do that) because I wanted to find out one particular detail that was worrying me.

Anyway...overall a great read. A sobering read. A lifelike story. Kudos to the author—nice job.
53 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Gray King
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Conscience and Dilemma
Reviewed in the United States on January 23, 2017
The storyline is simple. Married couple, isolated, working an important Lighthouse, trying to have, but failing to have, children. A boat washes up in which there is a dead man and a living breathing three month old baby. Despite the unlikely scenario, what follows gave me... See more
The storyline is simple. Married couple, isolated, working an important Lighthouse, trying to have, but failing to have, children. A boat washes up in which there is a dead man and a living breathing three month old baby. Despite the unlikely scenario, what follows gave me reason to explore my own logic. What would l have done, felt, experienced, decided under a myriad of events that are both cause, and effect of circumstances. The reading journey is so worth it. The leftover taste in your memory will last a lifetime. The tears of both joy and despair will sit either side of you - to debate, to fight and argue forever. For this is a timeless story that leaves both scar and mark. Read it.
36 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Angela
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The synopsis seemed like a great story
Reviewed in the United States on January 1, 2018
I had looked forward to reading this book for so long. The synopsis seemed like a great story. Little did I know how much this would affect me. The Light Between Oceans tells the tale of a war hero and a headmaster’s daughter who fall in love and move to an... See more
I had looked forward to reading this book for so long. The synopsis seemed like a great story. Little did I know how much this would affect me.

The Light Between Oceans tells the tale of a war hero and a headmaster’s daughter who fall in love and move to an island so he can be a lightkeeper. Tom, the lightkeeper, is quiet and subdued. He doesn’t shed much light on his past and we only know bits and pieces. Isabel, a young feisty girl, falls for Tom hard and burrows her way into his life. They are the perfect team and suited for each other well. But there’s only one problem. They can’t have children, the one thing that Isabel wants most in life.

After the loss of their third child, Isabel is distraught and deep in mourning. But a dinghy floats onto the shores of their island carrying a deceased man and a young baby. Immediately Isabel takes to the little one, who they call Lucy. She convinces her husband to keep the child, justifying it by God giving them a child to replace the one they’d just lost. But what happens when they find out the baby has a mother who is alive, and living not far from them?

This story offers so much. As a mother of three beautiful children, I can’t imagine one of them disappearing and not knowing what became of them. On the other hand, I can’t imagine never having them in my life and wanting so desperately to have children of my own. The Light Between Oceans is a deep reflection on two mothers’ love for the same child, although different to each one. M.L. Stedman has a wonderful writing style; both straightforward and poetic. While some parts of the book seemed to drag, overall this story kept my interest and had me in tears by the end.
18 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Tigerlily64
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wrong Decisions. Painful Consequences.
Reviewed in the United States on April 9, 2017
I had very mixed feelings about this book. It certainly is not great literature, though the writing improved as the story progressed. Undoubtedly, it is rather contrived and predictable story, but it still had a definite pull on me. The scene for most of the... See more
I had very mixed feelings about this book. It certainly is not great literature, though the writing improved as the story progressed. Undoubtedly, it is rather contrived and predictable story, but it still had a definite pull on me.

The scene for most of the book is a desolate island off the coast of Australia in the 1920s. Tom is the lighthouse keeper and has recently come back from WW I. The lonely life as keeper of the lighthouse appeals to him; it gives him the routine and discipline that is helpful to assuage the guilt he feels that his own life was spared but so many of his friends died in the War. He marries Isabel, a young woman who has lived a protective life but thinks of life on this island as a romantic adventure. The couple very much wants a child but, unfortunately, Isabel has three miscarriages. One day a boat washes up on the shore with a dead man and a living three-month-old baby girl. Isabel says it is God’s will that they were given this miracle baby and pressures her husband into keeping it.

This book is about choices. Isabel feels she deserves the baby. Tom thinks it is wrong for them to keep it, but he goes against his better judgment and gives in to Isabel’s wishes. Because of this lack of moral integrity, they cause much pain to themselves and others and are estranged from each other.

It was hard for me to feel sympathetic to Isabel. In fact, I did not like her. (Tom was more appealing and loving). Isobel had three miscarriages, which is sad, but she did nothing to consult a doctor between them. She was irresponsible in not having a doctor examine her. Perhaps, her miscarriages could have been prevented if she had done so. Isabel selfishly kept the baby without any consideration for the real mother. The island was not far from civilization, and inquiries could have been made. Isabel had no remorse for keeping Lucy, the baby, even when the real mother was located. She justified keeping the baby away from her birth mother by saying it was better for Lucy not to be uprooted from the only parents she knew. Isabel was a selfish person who let her husband get blamed for keeping the baby. Only towards the very end of the book did she take some of the blame on herself. Tom did jail time for his part, whereas she ended up on probation in the care of her parents.

During the convolutions of the plot, the right decision to make at a given time is called into question. Lucy is very happy with Isabel and Tom. Is it right to uproot her and return her to her birth mother, a stranger? Lucy goes through heartbreaking torment, as does her mother. However, eventually, the little girl adjusts to the birth family that loves her.

The last part of the book is somewhat redeeming because Tom and Isabel are living more honestly. However, it was hard for me to deeply immerse myself in the book when I could not identify with Isabel even though I have suffered a miscarriage as well.

This is the author’s first novel, so, perhaps, the second will be better.
20 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Linda
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A RIVETING PAGE TURNER OF LOVE & LOSS.
Reviewed in the United States on March 2, 2017
M. L. Stedman''s, "The Light Between Oceans," is a riveting page turner of love and loss. It''s a heart wrenching, tortured tale of moral integrity, desperation, betrayal, and the choices we make. Like a lighthouse, this story shines light on the dark places within you, where... See more
M. L. Stedman''s, "The Light Between Oceans," is a riveting page turner of love and loss. It''s a heart wrenching, tortured tale of moral integrity, desperation, betrayal, and the choices we make. Like a lighthouse, this story shines light on the dark places within you, where right and wrong blend together and justify the consequences when the human heart is involved. This brilliantly written novel will tear at your heartstrings and stay with you long after you''ve finished reading it. Read it with a box of Kleenex.

"It''s not always plain sailing, even when you''ve found the right girl. You''ve got to be in it for the long haul. You never know what''s going to happen: you sign up for whatever comes along." — M. L. Stedman, "The Light Between Oceans"

"He struggles to make sense of it—all this love, so bent out of shape, like light through the lens." — M. L. Stedman, "The Light Between Oceans"

"We live with the decisions we make. ... That''s what bravery is. Standing by the consequences of your mistakes." — M. L. Stedman, "The Light Between Oceans"

"I can leave myself to rot in the past, spend my time hating people for what happened, ... or I can forgive and forget. ... It is so much less exhausting. You only have to forgive once. To resent, you have to do it all day, every day. You have to keep remembering all the bad things. ... We have a choice. All of us." —M. L. Stedman, "The Light Between Oceans"
19 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Jessamyn Rock
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good historical fiction
Reviewed in the United States on March 9, 2019
This book has been sitting on my bookshelf for awhile. My parents gave it to me a long time ago to read and I just never had the time until now. The novel looks at how a decision affects not only a person, but all those around him. Tom is a WWI veteran haunted by his... See more
This book has been sitting on my bookshelf for awhile. My parents gave it to me a long time ago to read and I just never had the time until now.
The novel looks at how a decision affects not only a person, but all those around him. Tom is a WWI veteran haunted by his experience. To escape his guilt of survive the Great War, he works as a lighthouse operator in isolated parts of Australia. Isabel is a young woman in a small town who falls in love with him. As they build their life in isolation at a lighthouse post on Janus Rock, Isabel suffers two miscarriages and a stillbirth. When a boat washes on shore with a dead man and a crying newborn, Isabel coaxes Tom into keeping the child to raise as their own. Tom grapples with this rule breaking, while Isabel comes out of depression and falls in love with this little baby girl. Soon they find out that the mother is still alive.
The book examines how decisions affect not just one person. Also, it makes you question was it truly wrong.
As a mother, this was a tough read. I do not know what I would do if I lost my children. Nor can I imagine never having closure if I did. While the ending is somewhat predictable, it is still beautifully written. A great historical fiction.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
K.B.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A story of tough choices
Reviewed in the United States on May 10, 2020
This book has been on my to be read list for a long time. And having now finally read it, I do think for the most part it lived up to the hype. I felt invested in the story and in the characters but I guess my only criticism is I wish I could have felt more. I didn''t shed... See more
This book has been on my to be read list for a long time. And having now finally read it, I do think for the most part it lived up to the hype. I felt invested in the story and in the characters but I guess my only criticism is I wish I could have felt more. I didn''t shed a tear until the end when I feel like there were parts of the story before that which should have made more of an emotional impact. I have way more positive feelings about this book than negative, but it wasn''t quite the five star read for me.

It''s 1926 and after fighting in the war, Tom Sherbourne, has taken up a job as a light keeper on Janus Rock, an isolated island off the Australian coast. Tom only is allowed to take leave every couple years and a supply boat visits only once a season. Tom eventually marries a young woman named Isabel and while they would love to start a family, unfortunately Isabel has suffered 2 miscarriages and a stillbirth. One day a boat washes up to shore with a dead man inside and also a baby who is very much alive. It''s his duty as a light keeper to report this discovery but Isabel wants to keep the baby and raise her as their own. No doubt whatever decision is made will have lasting consequences.

The author does a great job at setting the scene as it was easy to imagine how isolating it would feel to live on Janus Rock. The setting without a doubt enhanced the story. I also thought it was a good choice to follow many characters as it allowed me to feel invested in each one and understand their viewpoints better. I might not have agreed with every choice that was made, but I could at least grasp where that person was coming from.

Going into reading this book I was expecting a tearjerker. There were quite a few things in the story that really should have hit me but they fell flat. The plot was good but it just felt like something was missing for so much of the book. Not sure why other than towards the end I didn''t connect on the same emotional level other readers did. For me this wasn''t a beautifully written story, instead it was just a very good story. Good enough that I would recommend it to the few of you who haven''t checked it out yet.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Mr. John Frank Herbert
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Light Upon YOUR Emotions!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 23, 2016
The film was just out at my local but I didn''t want to spoil my reading of the book, so I gave the film a miss. I''ve just put the book down in a flood of tears as I turned into the last few pages. Tears for goodness sake! Oh but such emotion, such a pulling in one...See more
The film was just out at my local but I didn''t want to spoil my reading of the book, so I gave the film a miss. I''ve just put the book down in a flood of tears as I turned into the last few pages. Tears for goodness sake! Oh but such emotion, such a pulling in one direction, and then another; you can feel for all sides, the crushing pain and emptiness of irretrievable loss. A child lost - a child found. A simple equation that will strip your thought waves, and dare you to choose which way you''re going to lean, and as it all comes to the inevitable gut-wrenching finale, you can feel the emotion of it all as it suddenly bites. And those final pages? If you''re teetering on the edge by this point, if those tear ducts are weighing it all up, these final pages will simply open up the floodgates. And the story? Just about a silly old Lighthouse in the middle of nowhere, and crashing waves, and a boat that washes up ashore, with a baby girl aboard. And if you believe it''s all as simple as that...... Think again!
42 people found this helpful
Report
Bookliterati
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautiful but haunting tale.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 23, 2016
Tom and Isabel live a happy but solitary life on Janus Island where Tom is the lighthouse keeper. The only blight on their existence is Isabel''s desperation for a baby. When one morning a boat washes up on the shore with a dead man but a living baby Isabel and Tom make a...See more
Tom and Isabel live a happy but solitary life on Janus Island where Tom is the lighthouse keeper. The only blight on their existence is Isabel''s desperation for a baby. When one morning a boat washes up on the shore with a dead man but a living baby Isabel and Tom make a decision that will have consequences not only for them but for Isabel''s family in Partaguese and Hannah, the baby''s real mother. This is a novel of decisions, consequences and human nature. It is an emotional tale of love, loss and the blurred lines between right and wrong. The writing is very atmospheric, and the characters well rounded. There is a lot of attention to detail in the authors description of both people and places. I really like thee historical detail of the lighthouses and how they were run in the early twentieth century. The character really do attract the reader''s empathy to the situation they find themselves in. I found it made me think what I would do in their situation especially as I was torn between the two sides of the story. It is an innovative and intelligent storyline full of emotion that will stay with you long after you finish the book.
28 people found this helpful
Report
Mary
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What would you do?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 16, 2020
With core themes of loss and moral dilemma this book makes us question the nature of love and right and wrong. I found myself wondering what I would have done in such heart wrenching circumstances. I chose it for my book club and one lady had visited the town the book is...See more
With core themes of loss and moral dilemma this book makes us question the nature of love and right and wrong. I found myself wondering what I would have done in such heart wrenching circumstances. I chose it for my book club and one lady had visited the town the book is based on and said that it pefectly captured the feel of the place. The main part of the book is evocative and beautifully realised while the latter part of the story felt thin and rushed by comparison. For me the story raised so many questions that the book could easily have been longer and I felt it would have benefitted from having the same level of detail applied throughout. This is a story that stays with you. It leaves you pondering the choices made and what you would have done in their shoes.
4 people found this helpful
Report
S. Slater
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Serenely beautiful story
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 26, 2017
A simple idyll; boy meets girl, they marry and live on a remote Australian lighthouse island where the two are bonnily happy but not for ''ever after''. Just as the lighthouse lamp continues to revolve, stealing its beam of glorious light, Tom and Isabel''s happiness is also...See more
A simple idyll; boy meets girl, they marry and live on a remote Australian lighthouse island where the two are bonnily happy but not for ''ever after''. Just as the lighthouse lamp continues to revolve, stealing its beam of glorious light, Tom and Isabel''s happiness is also swept swiftly and brutally away. Their lives implode around three miscarriages/stillbirths and the misery that entails for their present and their future loss of family. Howeve just as day follows night, a beam of light sweeps into their lives with the unexpected and totally inexplicable arrival of a rowing boat with a dead body and a young baby in it. The ensuing dilemma and actions are all driven by love but with oscillating consequences of lightness and dark. I can''t tell you any more without ruining the plot but I loved this book, it demanded late night page turning and whilst the darkest moments of plot meant I finished it through a veil of tears, there with still a beam of light returning to lift your soul, right at the bitter end. Go buy it.
16 people found this helpful
Report
Michelle
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Recommended
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 30, 2018
This is such a hard book to review as each chapter left me conflicted, each sentance changed my thoughts, my idea of right and wrong and even after the final word I''m at a loss to where I stand morally on this. Welcome to the fictional Janus Island off the western coast of...See more
This is such a hard book to review as each chapter left me conflicted, each sentance changed my thoughts, my idea of right and wrong and even after the final word I''m at a loss to where I stand morally on this. Welcome to the fictional Janus Island off the western coast of Australia where the lighthouse beams each night providing a clear passage for sailors, the light is the only clear part of this book. This would make a great book club book as there''s a ton of discussion points. Recommended and I would definitely now watch the film.
6 people found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Explore similar books

Tags that will help you discover similar books. 16 tags
Results for: 
Where do clickable book tags come from?
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • books about australia
  • books to read to babies
  • discount books
  • ww ii
  • ny time
  • ship of the line

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale

The sale lowest Light Between Oceans sale